Epic of Kibotesh for lazy guys.

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  • Epic of Kibotesh for lazy guys.

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    In bg T9A archeology is considered very important, this crumbles the myth that the universe t9a is likely and follows logical laws. However between mummies and dwarfs of chaos we have two archeology works. Well? Bad? Even today, peace reigns in a wargame.
    This piece is the result of the studies of the life of Ludwig Horschluss, it is a translation work on some tablets found in archaeological excavations etc .. he did not make the excavations, so this story has been going on for a long time. Do your considerations on archaeological missions and assassins on the orient express in a medieval / modern / fantasy wargame, I don't want to judge.
    Joking aside, this piece of bg reminds us of the Giglaesh epic, if you've studied archeology or ancient history, you probably know what I'm talking about, if you don't know, there is a wiki.
    the story speaks of the epic of Kibotesh and Lugar, the founding heroes of the Infernal Dwarfs. Some pieces are missing.
    Kibotesh is the non plus ultra of dwarves in all fields. The hero par excellence. The coolest. The King. He builds city temples and reigns unchallenged, indeed, abuses his power and vexes the population.
    The gods (generic) are upset and Ashuruk, the king of the gods, creates Lugar, a cool and smart guy, to counter the power of Kibotesh.
    But with a plot twist, the two come to terms and became super friends.
    Kibotesh and Lugar are traveling, dealing with monsters, including Shabut the first bull and his companions. In the meantime, there are cataclysms such as volcanic eruptions, perhaps toxic, but everything is fine. They are good things for our heroes and they all become friends.
    Lugar also saves Gantar, a chick from the Netherworld and here is the joke to the DH: no real dwarf wants to live underground.
    Gantar, who is a very beautiful dwarf, falls in love with Kibotesh and wants to marry him, but the dwarf lady is a killer of husbands, she has killed many. In fact, she asks Shabut to give her, his strongest bull to kill Kibotesh, the bull is as big as a city, but Gantar meets Lugar who asks if she has permission to keep the animal. Gantar does not have it and takes the fine.
    But Gantar goes to cry from the gods and they kill Lugar.
    Lugar dies and Kibotesh is desperate and afraid of dying. Then he travels, kills giant scorpions and finds a passage to the garden of the gods, where he finds a flower that rejuvenates it and seems to give it eternal life, which, however, is stolen by a snake.
    Meanwhile, in the Netherworld Lugar had already budgeted everything and he gets away thanks to another bureaucratic trap and manages to enter the hall of the gods, making a mockery of Taugruk, the guardian of the hall of the gods. Taugruk says that to be a god one must not be able to die. Lugar cannot die because he is exiled from the Netherworld. Lugar becomes a god.
    But the gods, Ashuruk in the first place, want to destroy Kibotesh and all the rest, so they send a flood and Ashuruk requires the gods to keep silence on his plan and Lugar is forced not to speak with Kibotesh.
    Lugar goes to Kibotesh and talks to his friend's elbow, effectively blurring everything. Kibotesh will have to build a large ziggurat to save himself from destruction. The flood extinguishes the flame of the world, but lugar steals another from an enemy king in a distant place and comes to save the situation. The gods repent and sign a covenant of honor with the dwarves.
    Table twelve incomplete to leave a shadow over the conqueror lugar.
  • A good summary, the story is well written and worth a read for the dry humor alone. Having read quite a few versions of the Gilgamesh saga, this one is equally amazing in what it does. The human perspective is not overdone and puts it in context while adding even more story around it at the same time. Many layers and open ends allow for points to start your own story.

    I hope this will reflect in the background: warriors and bean counters. You had better read what you sign. :D Snippets we have seen so far in the scroll sure seem to suggest this. Another great book to read and nice quality content.
  • Little Joe wrote:

    A good summary, the story is well written and worth a read for the dry humor alone. Having read quite a few versions of the Gilgamesh saga, this one is equally amazing in what it does. The human perspective is not overdone and puts it in context while adding even more story around it at the same time. Many layers and open ends allow for points to start your own story.

    I hope this will reflect in the background: warriors and bean counters. You had better read what you sign. :D Snippets we have seen so far in the scroll sure seem to suggest this. Another great book to read and nice quality content.
    I like it, I've studied middle east arch, so I knew the direction of the plot. of giglamesh saga I like also (shame on me and on my degree) the complottist subplot about the little square bag that they have and that make them travel fast as a teleport. I was suprised I didn't found here. I wish to know more about the background of today-timeline
  • I've never studied archeology or history (I'm a biologist) and I'm familiar with the Epic of Gilgamesh just from general nerdery, so I don't feel it's too obscure?

    And you dont' need to have read the Epic to appreciate this. This is a perfectly straighforward read as a legend on its own, it's just funnier if you know what it is parodying.

    Plus it's really funny. I was worried for a while that compared to Warhammer, Ninth Age didn't have enough silly jokes. This entire thing is supremely silly and I love it. It's like something by Terry Gilliam.
    I have whirl’d with the earth at the dawningWhen the sky was a vaporous flameI have seen the dark universe yawning,
    Where the black planets roll without aim;
    Where they roll in their horror unheeded, without knowledge or lustre or name.
  • JimMorr wrote:

    Don't you feel it is a bit hermetic if to fully appreciate it you need university archaeological background..?

    As I am simple electrical engineer I can only say from my perspective I wouldn't distinguish great adaptation of an ancient work from from a story written by a 8yo. So I can't say if it is good or bad. Sorry.
    I read it on my search for old mythological origins (looking for the origin of scorpion men) and if you can find a translation for children without all the extra baggage, those are often quite good. It's a good story and you will be amazed how much of it you already know. ;)

    Eldan wrote:

    I've never studied archeology or history (I'm a biologist) and I'm familiar with the Epic of Gilgamesh just from general nerdery, so I don't feel it's too obscure?

    And you dont' need to have read the Epic to appreciate this. This is a perfectly straighforward read as a legend on its own, it's just funnier if you know what it is parodying.

    Plus it's really funny. I was worried for a while that compared to Warhammer, Ninth Age didn't have enough silly jokes. This entire thing is supremely silly and I love it. It's like something by Terry Gilliam.
    ^ What he said. :thumbsup:
  • I didn't have time yet to read it and only skipped through it, but chances are I will love it :) hopefully I will get around reading it this weekend.
    I really hope there will be a pure fluff document in authentic style like this and circling the abyss for every LAB release!
    I don't share the "not easy to read" concerns, at all. With the LABs, ok, but these are supposed to be authentic in-world texts. More like RP material.

    The post was edited 1 time, last by ToDD ().

  • JimMorr wrote:

    Don't you feel it is a bit hermetic if to fully appreciate it you need university archaeological background..?

    As I am simple electrical engineer I can only say from my perspective I wouldn't distinguish great adaptation of an ancient work from from a story written by a 8yo. So I can't say if it is good or bad. Sorry.
    what you say is true, but this is indeed one of the first poem that humans have. very important.
    and the bg pieces is not in a newspaper, is an official pubblication of Ullsberg university. so this guy is a PhD. it is for an elitè audience (on inside world view).
  • Mercenary Armies wrote:

    In bg T9A archeology is considered very important
    I believe this points to the Empire of Sonnstahl being very different in culture and organization to the WH Empire of Sigmar.
    We might get more and more surprised as we start learning more about it.
    I don't why, but I have the feeling that it might turn out to be a weird mix of fantasy and Victorian steampunk, much like Ankh-Morpork.

    Eldan wrote:

    Plus it's really funny. I was worried for a while that compared to Warhammer, Ninth Age didn't have enough silly jokes. This entire thing is supremely silly and I love it. It's like something by Terry Gilliam.
    :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

    Russian Translation Coordinator

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    Public Relations

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    GHAÂAÂAÂARN ! — The Black Goat of the Woods with a Thousand Young
    First T9A player in West Africa
  • Ghiznuk wrote:

    Mercenary Armies wrote:

    In bg T9A archeology is considered very important
    I believe this points to the Empire of Sonnstahl being very different in culture and organization to the WH Empire of Sigmar.We might get more and more surprised as we start learning more about it.
    I don't why, but I have the feeling that it might turn out to be a weird mix of fantasy and Victorian steampunk, much like Ankh-Morpork.
    We don't really need to go that far ;)




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  • I just wanted to say how great I thought this bit of background was. It’s the best thing to come out of the background team to date in my opinion.

    I knew it was gonna be good when I read the introduction and it was a scholar talking about the poem - the dry humour, almost unintentional, just made this so enjoyable.

    I’ve never read any of the stories this may have been based on in reality (though I know of them) but I still really enjoyed this. It’s a way easy read. If it weren't in poem form and triple-spaced, it would easily be a one page document: and the vocabulary is quite basic, so I don’t think it’s inaccessible to us lay-people. (or as the opera-lovers call us: the great unwashed!)


    Thank you to those who produced it! :thumbsup:

    The post was edited 1 time, last by Dalinar ().

  • Mostly, I just laughed out loud when the snake stole immortality.

    Because that's what happens in Gilgamesh. His friend dies and he goes on an epic journey to find a way to ressurect him and gain immortality, actually finds it after many trials and then... a snake steals it and he gives up. No further explanation.
    I have whirl’d with the earth at the dawningWhen the sky was a vaporous flameI have seen the dark universe yawning,
    Where the black planets roll without aim;
    Where they roll in their horror unheeded, without knowledge or lustre or name.
  • New

    Finally read it this morning.

    I loved how suddenly the story stops to describe exactly how the boat was build, then again as a running gag how the huge pyramid has to be built, and how, suddenly and very conveniently, we read « 49 missing lines », just so that we get the idea of what is there, preserving the comic effect without forcing us to read through actual 49 lines of how the stones should be put and what cement to use, etc.

    Russian Translation Coordinator

    Translation-Team FR

    Public Relations

    Linguistic Team

    GHAÂAÂAÂARN ! — The Black Goat of the Woods with a Thousand Young
    First T9A player in West Africa
  • New

    Ghiznuk wrote:

    Finally read it this morning.

    I loved how suddenly the story stops to describe exactly how the boat was build, then again as a running gag how the huge pyramid has to be built, and how, suddenly and very conveniently, we read « 49 missing lines », just so that we get the idea of what is there, preserving the comic effect without forcing us to read through actual 49 lines of how the stones should be put and what cement to use, etc.
    very usefull to know everything about my Overlord.
  • New

    Ghiznuk wrote:

    Finally read it this morning.

    I loved how suddenly the story stops to describe exactly how the boat was build, then again as a running gag how the huge pyramid has to be built, and how, suddenly and very conveniently, we read « 49 missing lines », just so that we get the idea of what is there, preserving the comic effect without forcing us to read through actual 49 lines of how the stones should be put and what cement to use, etc.
    That's also directly taken from the Mesopotamian stories. There's an old Mesopotamian version of Noah's Ark, which gives several pages worth of details on how exactly the gods wanted the boat to be built. Much more than what has survived to the modern Bible, which has mostly the size, but not all the materials and construction techniques used.
    I have whirl’d with the earth at the dawningWhen the sky was a vaporous flameI have seen the dark universe yawning,
    Where the black planets roll without aim;
    Where they roll in their horror unheeded, without knowledge or lustre or name.