New models from Games Workshop

  • Pellegrim wrote:

    Ag I have a few if those and their quality is terrible. GW plastics are much better.
    Which models do you have?
    I have a bunch of bones miniatures and the quality is typically really good detail wise. Usually I judge a models details by looking at the face and seeing if its all smushed. or some finer detail lines on the figure to see if they have definition.

    If you are complaining because a spear is bent then ya ok, the material is very bendy so strait stuff doesn't do so well. ....but there are easy model tricks to correct that.
    What I care about mostly is if I can paint the eyes.
  • I think the beauty of plastic is that many types of it can serve for many different purposes. As mentioned quality is really in the eye of the beholder and the mixes of plastic also really differ in eventual product outcome. To give a small impression of what I know is on the market (PVC):

    0. One piece models, you know them, McDonalds has them from time to time and they use one mold, for a un-cut model which creates a nice 'blob with features'.
    1. Bones quality, decent for models with a lot of natural curves, bad for modes with a lot of hard angles, what I mean by this is that there is a low combination of hard angles and smooth surfaces going on.
    2. PrivateerPress quality, they have recently begun starting with GW plastic quality for their Warjacks and like GW this works out really well for models with smooth surfaces. The cuts allow for some hard angles but in general you can see the typical difference between the two PP plastics. Because the other that they use (and have used for the longest amount of time) is one that isn't far away from Bones' quality. Works for smooth surfaces, not really for hard angles.
    3. Games Workshop and Wyrd quality, without doubt they are the 'masters of miniature plastics', knowing where the cuts are needed to create both smooth surface models (very well) and hard angles (good). It's the cut up miniatures that require a lot of assembly however they do manage to reach compairable quality as that of a mediocre to decent Resin cast.
    4. Resin or Tin/White Metal compounds, the best product available for few cuts and retaining the quality of both smooth surfaces and hard angles. However this product is also very hazardous by comparison and therefore unhealthy for the world wide consumer.

    Re-producing models is always a comprimise between material and cuts. Practically any wished for quality can be obtained but the question is how much assembly time your willing to create for your end product. Models from GW and Wyrd can thake me hours to assemble, Resin or White Metal models can be assembled in under an hour.
  • Emperor_Zoron wrote:

    @JDAntoine where do Perry's plastic fit into that? How would you describe them?
    I only have one box of Perry miniatures: perry-miniatures.com/product_i…bi3nu3pg9a2hogdik44dr50h3

    Overall, I would say the poses are less dynamic then GW or Wyrd models. More like the GW 6th/7th edition boxes. (Rigid bodies with swappable arms.)
    But the models look much more natural than the GW models. They are significantly smaller, though. And a lot cleaner. (Not covered in poaches, knifes, etc.)
    I believe the plastic they use is identical to the GW material. The casts are almost free of mold lines and are very quick to assemble.
  • Emperor_Zoron wrote:

    @JDAntoine where do Perry's plastic fit into that? How would you describe them?
    I'd say a typical 2.5, floating somewhere in between PP and GW/Wyrd quality. Their plastic quality is slightly below that of GW but largely because the more naturalistic sculpts allow for it.

    As @Arrahed mentioned the historical accurate design of models is what sells Perry miniatures. Because of that almost all the sculpts are logically scaled and also have less 'hard angles' as historically armour looks nothing alike what GW or Wyrd provides in their miniatures.

    (What occured to me personally however is that the unrealistic design is exactly what emotionally triggers people. With this I mean that an object with smooth surfaces and soft surfaces is often more interesting for the brain to process as something that is largely smooth or largely angled. Because of that Fantastical miniatures are often more popular.)

    Personal preforance leads to the ideal use for everything though. Quality is in the eye of the beholder and as disccused with @Kanadian higher quality doesn't always mean that this is what you 'need'. :)

    The Perry mini's are great for historical wargaming and a lot of them can also be used for T9A, they are "smaller" but that's largue due how historical gaming doesn't incorporate creatures of fantastical sizes :D because of that it can be really difficult to use Perry miniatures for your armies and not have that Dragon, Ogre or Warmachine stand out like a massive oddity.

    Offtopic
    More importantly than everything else though is that the 'cuts' can lead to practically any desired quality.

    We can even replicate a small part of a miniature with plastic molding for ourselfs, as long as it's a 'cut detail'. I forgot the name of the compagny that sells those little straps of plastic which you need to put in boiled water to create a 'press mold' but it's ideal to use with greenstuff for small and little details. To the point where trying to replicate the orginal sculpt is almost a futile attempt when you can thake an easier route.

    It's that press mold technique with greenstuff that allowed Scibor to become so huge those years ago. Still gotta love that ease of miniature replication.

    The post was edited 1 time, last by JDAntoine ().

  • JDAntoine wrote:

    The Perry mini's are great for historical wargaming and a lot of them can also be used for T9A, they are "smaller" but that's largue due how historical gaming doesn't incorporate creatures of fantastical sizes because of that it can be really difficult to use Perry miniatures for your armies and not have that Dragon, Ogre or Warmachine stand out like a massive oddity.

    Fair enough on the war machines... But... Ogres and dragons are inhuman. They are suppose to stick out like a sore thumb. If anything it would be more fitting, I'd think.

    Campaign Team


  • Emperor_Zoron wrote:

    Fair enough on the war machines... But... Ogres and dragons are inhuman. They are suppose to stick out like a sore thumb. If anything it would be more fitting, I'd think.
    They will, but it depends on which stuff you intent to blend it with.

    I think for EoS or KoE these models are really fine, not too much extravagant model designs elsewhere. But using such knights for other factions can lead to some oddities, for example WotDG blends of historical models and full fantasy models usually look like something I'd personally not prefer. The models can be painted into a theme but some factions just breath more fantasy designs as others.
  • JDAntoine wrote:

    Emperor_Zoron wrote:

    Fair enough on the war machines... But... Ogres and dragons are inhuman. They are suppose to stick out like a sore thumb. If anything it would be more fitting, I'd think.
    They will, but it depends on which stuff you intent to blend it with.
    I think for EoS or KoE these models are really fine, not too much extravagant model designs elsewhere. But using such knights for other factions can lead to some oddities, for example WotDG blends of historical models and full fantasy models usually look like something I'd personally not prefer. The models can be painted into a theme but some factions just breath more fantasy designs as others.

    True... Can also create an interesting comparison though. Like, the chosen are suppose to stick out from the regular barbarians CAUSE they are insane/mutant/semi-inhuman.

    Though it is a delicate balance. >_>

    Campaign Team


  • Just a consumer note here, since the topic of resin miniature quality and pricing came up in several posts...

    ...I do not know the technical aspects of how resins are made, and I do not know the cost of achieving higher levels of resin detail. I do not know how much difference in detail there really is between the resin vendors listed on this website.

    But I do know this as a consumer and as a gamer who might be helping a new player get an army together and get the most for their value:

    Shield Wolf Miniatures sells two different kinds of skeleton regiments, 20 figires for 20 Euros. In resin. They look really nice, really good detail. 20 figures with full command for 20 Euros.

    Kanadian by contrast sells 20 figure skeleton regiments with full command for SIXTY, 60 Euros, for the same size unit. In resin. That is THREE times the cost for one regiment. I can get SIX skeleton regiments from Shield Wolf for what it costs to get TWO from Kanadian's site.

    I sincerely doubt that Kanadian's resin is three times better in detail which would account for triple the price. There is no difference in detail to me personally that would justify triple the price.

    Now if I'm a veteran gamer and I have a friend who wants to start an Undead army, where do you think I'm going to direct him? To a site where you can get two regiments for 120 Euros, or a site where you can get SIX regiments for 120 Euros?

    Sorry, but that's a no-brainer from a consumer standpoint. Would be a hard sell to convince that new player to pay three times the price for the same number of minis because the detail is supposedly so far beyond the competitors.
    There are many magic rings in the world Bilbo Baggins, and none of them should be used lightly!
  • Morgan_Treeman wrote:

    that's correct but you singled out the worst costed unit on the TMS website, and that doesn't represent all that TMS has to offer. Check out some of the other models like the sphinx or tomb reapers, even the equitaine models looks really nice.
    Oh no, that's true his stuff is really nice, no denying that. The KOE Lord on Hippogriff is a really nice model for 40 Euros, that's a decent price. That is one model from his site that I would actually consider buying and could recommend to my gaming friends.

    I just think he needs to bring the prices for his core units down quite a bit if he wants to compete. His current prices for his core regiments are just way too high, I know I would never buy them.
    There are many magic rings in the world Bilbo Baggins, and none of them should be used lightly!

    The post was edited 1 time, last by Baranovich ().

  • Guys, I too agree if someone wants to start an army, he is probably far more interested to get an army as fast a possible, for a good price. And you would be correct to send him to anything but out 9th legion models, as they are directed for a veteran gamer who is interested in getting a unique army that no one else has, that is sculpted in superb detail and cast in the finest resin. If you directed a new player who isn't interested in that of unit to the 9th Legion line, you would wrong the new player. But if you have a gamer who is interested in a rare and beautifully crafted miniatures for his back of the book list, then you would be correct to point out our 9th Legion line, over some other choices.

    Why the price difference. Its because of production efficiency. As stated earlier, the biggest cost in casting resin miniatures is labour.
    Example.
    Say each day one worker can prepare and casts 100 forms.
    1. If your model is in one lump you cast a 100 models.
    2. If you have 2 part model, then in a days work gets you 50 models. Twice as expensive as example 1
    3. If your model has 6 parts, then for a days work you can make 16 models. 5 times as expensive as example 1

    Hope this shines some light on the matter. Naturally things are a little more complicated, and more components are involved in calculating the shelf price.

    And I realise that the price is not for every one. And we acknowledge it. Thankfully you have a choice of what models you can purchase from who. All we can do is widen our offer, and hope your preference and our models meet in other areas.

    The post was edited 1 time, last by Kanadian ().