What we can do to get new players – no whining, only concrete proposals and inspiring stuff ^^

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to our Cookie Policy.

The latest issue of the 9th Scroll is here! You can read all about it in the news.

  • So we discuss 'target customers' a lot.

    But who are they? There's two that often get the most attention.

    Who are we appealing to with the design of T9A?

    Ex-Warhammer Players:The obvious elephant in the room - disenfranchised Warhammerplayers who aren't attracted to The Age of Sigmar as a replacementto 'their' game. T9A allows them to continue playing with theirmodel collections.

    Competitive Table Top:Players who are interested in a deep, 'balanced' game that has athriving meta for them to push and test in an effort to constantly onthe competitive edge.

    But who beyond this? Who in the wider game market are we appealing to? Some Ideas:

    DIY Gamers - Gamers who want to have the miniatures freedom. Gamers who want to roll up their sleeves and do it themselves. Gamers who like doing it for themselves. They don't care about not having a bigger corporate backer. They enjoy that T9A is a PLATFORM to build a cool game, share your ideas, playtest them, and connect with likeminded gamers. We have that 'maker' element - its not *the main* element, but its there. I love the home-brew section - and as I build my local community I will encourage people to try those things out, try out the home-brew lists, scenarios, spell lists, magic items, etc...

    the foundation of T9A is the core game and its cousin the quickstarter - but what we have is the ability to grow organically and collaboratively. This is a community of gamers who said "With some help from others, I can do it better" we want that DIY spirit. Sculpting, rules writing, fluff writing, etc... we want those who aren't afraid to dig in and do it themselves.

    Beer & Pretzel Gamers - After gold, the game will shift. The updates will slow/stop and the focus will be on building the world and releasing the FAB's. With this in mind the project will shift away from our hyper balance and towards gaming growth; auxilary lists, Pirates Peril, Expanded Quickstart/Warbands (ideas, nothing concrete), the new Orc themed ideas teased in the scroll, etc...
    What this means is we will have a balanced core game where fluffy lists can stand a chance against the Cheese lists, where your T9A army can also board a pirate ship and duke it out for treasure in a skirmish setting, or where you can play fast and furious ranks and flanks using the expanded QS rules and maybe run a round robin tournament over a single day (1.5 hours a matchup, 6 matches in a single day).

    T9A currently reminds me of the early days of WHFB - we sow the field with ideas and resources, but we let the community tend the garden for us and show us what grows. The thematic batreps in the scroll by Tony & Paul are great examples.

    @Henrypmiller I would absolutely love it if we started showcasing some of the more popular homebrew threads in the scroll - as it really highlights these aspects. You've already been very good at showing them lately with the extra units, and scenarios we've shown lately.

    Get these DIY hobbyists involved in our game and they will anchor communities around themselves.

    Head of Lectors

    Quick Starter Team

    "...take a step back and remember that we are playing a game where we roll dice and move little people around the board."

    - Grouchy Badger

  • Nothing concrete.

    This is why I don't want to really spend a lot of time on AoS gamers per-se. Sure, there will be a lot of people who play AoS that may not know about T9A, and may prefer it - but a lot of people who play and enjoy AoS may like it for all the things we arent:

    Simple, if unclear rules, Skirmish, and corporate backed with a lot of material handed by the company.

    We're the linux of fantasy wargaming. AoS is the Apple.

    its about how we present the game - and showcasing the DIY attitude may attract people who are looking for that aspect of the game. That 'personal involvement

    This is mostly my 'salesman's hunch' - but I'm not sure how we can realistically get concrete data for this...

    Head of Lectors

    Quick Starter Team

    "...take a step back and remember that we are playing a game where we roll dice and move little people around the board."

    - Grouchy Badger

  • kisanis wrote:

    So we discuss 'target customers' a lot.

    But who are they? There's two that often get the most attention.

    Who are we appealing to with the design of T9A?

    Ex-Warhammer Players:The obvious elephant in the room - disenfranchised Warhammerplayers who aren't attracted to The Age of Sigmar as a replacementto 'their' game. T9A allows them to continue playing with theirmodel collections.

    Competitive Table Top:Players who are interested in a deep, 'balanced' game that has athriving meta for them to push and test in an effort to constantly onthe competitive edge.

    But who beyond this? Who in the wider game market are we appealing to? Some Ideas:

    DIY Gamers - Gamers who want to have the miniatures freedom. Gamers who want to roll up their sleeves and do it themselves. Gamers who like doing it for themselves. They don't care about not having a bigger corporate backer. They enjoy that T9A is a PLATFORM to build a cool game, share your ideas, playtest them, and connect with likeminded gamers. We have that 'maker' element - its not *the main* element, but its there. I love the home-brew section - and as I build my local community I will encourage people to try those things out, try out the home-brew lists, scenarios, spell lists, magic items, etc...

    the foundation of T9A is the core game and its cousin the quickstarter - but what we have is the ability to grow organically and collaboratively. This is a community of gamers who said "With some help from others, I can do it better" we want that DIY spirit. Sculpting, rules writing, fluff writing, etc... we want those who aren't afraid to dig in and do it themselves.

    Beer & Pretzel Gamers - After gold, the game will shift. The updates will slow/stop and the focus will be on building the world and releasing the FAB's. With this in mind the project will shift away from our hyper balance and towards gaming growth; auxilary lists, Pirates Peril, Expanded Quickstart/Warbands (ideas, nothing concrete), the new Orc themed ideas teased in the scroll, etc...
    What this means is we will have a balanced core game where fluffy lists can stand a chance against the Cheese lists, where your T9A army can also board a pirate ship and duke it out for treasure in a skirmish setting, or where you can play fast and furious ranks and flanks using the expanded QS rules and maybe run a round robin tournament over a single day (1.5 hours a matchup, 6 matches in a single day).

    T9A currently reminds me of the early days of WHFB - we sow the field with ideas and resources, but we let the community tend the garden for us and show us what grows. The thematic batreps in the scroll by Tony & Paul are great examples.

    @Henrypmiller I would absolutely love it if we started showcasing some of the more popular homebrew threads in the scroll - as it really highlights these aspects. You've already been very good at showing them lately with the extra units, and scenarios we've shown lately.

    Get these DIY hobbyists involved in our game and they will anchor communities around themselves.


    DIY gamer - spot on! Strongly identify with that.
  • SWOT analysis may be of help in this case, the way i see it:

    Strenghts:
    Young and motivated team;
    Group of motivated players that want to contribute more;
    Highly independent, not bound to any "Producing Company";
    No money waste, minis keep their price like gold, sometimes even better!
    Creative freedom

    Weaknesses:
    High time engagement;
    High amount of models to buy to get started;
    Complex rules that needs a lot of attention ATB;
    First games may take a lot longer to complete and that may throw some people off;
    Lore - i know it exists, but game doesn't put any pressure on knowing it, and damn it i wanted to know why Azhag was a sorcerrer, that's why i read about him.

    Opportunities:
    One and only tournament version of WFB universe alike players;
    Engaging community into army creation process - some folks out there have incredible ideas how to shift a unit role, etc;
    Social media - using it for anything starting from guides about game phases, up to tournament relations, great content for both new and "returning" players
    AoS is kindda stupidly easy right now, highest competitior on the market i think;
    Creation of our own lore;
    More interactions between units, heros, etc. I know there are books out there that shift a lot of focus into it. We are a curious beast, so want to know why it works the way it does!
    Local gaming clubs need to have a positive "vibe" - i have to say my is very new players friendly and that has been a great help for me

    Threats:
    t9a is based on old system, the ones that have the fresh approach could stand firmer;
    AoS is easily accessable to young players/kids;
    Not using highly devoted/expirience player base to advance the game that is basicly made by players for players;
    Gaming systems that do not require such high time/money/both engagement - many players shift due to their responsibiliteis. Ugh, kids ...

    Just my thoughts. What do you think?
    IMO the burden lies on:
    1) "friend circles" you probably won't start collecting if you don't have a friend to share your hobby with;
    2) local game clubs - acceptive approach i the key to evolve into more complete player and a stepping stone into future tournament focus, plus you meet a lot more people that share your passion
    3) Social Media engagement - guides on "How to do a Magic Phase" could ba a lot of helo to new players, and old timers can really enjoy some tournaments relations, etc...
    :O&G: + :DH: = A Waaagh! Hold
  • Yep.

    We need guides on the different phases,

    Also illustrated Army Guides, for example « The Orc & Goblin Player Handbook ». That would basically be same content as the different army introduction pages, but printable. (with introduction, some fluff, rules, discussion on strategy/tactics, gallery and army examples), etc.
    GHAÂAÂAÂARN ! — The Black Goat of the Woods with a Thousand Young
    First T9A player in West Africa
  • Back to some proposals what to do.
    Looking at my kings of war historicals book by me, I think they did a really good and smart thing and it inspired me.

    What if we created a compedium of units to cater for historical players, it will be an unit entries of common human units with different equipment options, also divided to core/special/rare (afterall tribal warrior didn't have the same rarity as war elephant, or cataphract).
    Then there would be a units for specific armies (like roman pretorians, doppelsoldner, barbarian berserkers, knight templar, janissary etc.) These will be army specific unit profiles which you can take in addition to the basic units.
    Then as a separate optional entry I would have the generic mythical beasts common to all (like some giant, winged horse, dragon).
    Entry for wizard will be a little bit tricky, I would probably go for a freedom of lore selection to compensate for just the human/animals unit entries.

    The thing is that lots of such profiles with points already exist in the current armybooks, so we can use these with existing points for a reference (this is how we did kislev book, by comparing and mixing and matching the similar unit entries from existing book).

    Why do this? If somebody with historical army would like to try, or somebody likes romans but his mates play t9a, the best what he can be offered is, here play as an EoS or KoE proxy, which is kind of unsatisfactory.

    And of course with pictures of painted models and units from our collections later.

    It won't probably be that balanced overall, but I guess it can bring a memorable games and that's the point, isn't it?
  • Hmm…

    Not sure about that last proposal.

    Because it would probably mean those armies are not fully compatible with the existing ones.

    I'd rather have someone create an « Ancient Avras army » homebrew, and maybe gradually expand, rather than go for a full-fledged « historical » extension.
    Note also that homebrew armies such as Koghi, al-Qassar, Iron Crowns and Ukray are already quite « historical » in feeling, just as Sonnstahl and Equitaine are.

    And if we go for such an extension, I'd rather keep it a separate game.
    But then, I mean, rules already exist for those historical armies, which are not bad. So I don't feel that community has a need for it.
    GHAÂAÂAÂARN ! — The Black Goat of the Woods with a Thousand Young
    First T9A player in West Africa
  • kisanis wrote:

    @Bugman
    I know Social Media lost some people recently - who do we have looking after the accounts?
    Checking
    http://www.bugmansbrewery.com - The largest most informative Fantasy Dwarf website on the net, covering every dwarfers needs from forum to tactics, balls to ships!

    Advisory Board

    Head of Public Relations

    Bugmans Brewery Owner (Dwarven Holds)

  • After quite some time, with help of my friends, I finally realized my idea of a tournament for new players and would like to share it with you.
    The idea was to run a tournament for doubles consisting of active and new (or inactive) players. This way the veteran would introduce his teammate to T9A (from list-building to actual game) and also enable him to play competitive battle and not getting 0:20 thrice.
    So we played 2x1500 pts, 3 battles. We had 8 teams (unfortunately several pairs dropped out just before tournament, which was foreseen for 12 pairs). Among those players we had 2 totally new players (who ended 2nd and 3rd), 4 players returning after many years who never played T9A (one of them got 1st) and my 6 year old son who got the prize for the youngest player :P
    To make sure this would be a nice event for newcomers we also prepared nice tables, terrains, well painted armies, diplomas, bbq and good weather ;) We also had several non-playing guests and some kids from neighbourhood running around - good opportunity to show them our hobby.

    I'm pretty sure we got some new players that day :thumbup:

    Coverage in link below ;)



    Next one probably in December.

    I hope it will be inspiration for some of you :)
    Team Belgium ETC 2006 O&G & 2007 Skaven
    Team Canada ETC 2010 & 2012 O&G
    My Beast Herd Gallery
    My O&G Gallery