Orcs should be supersticious

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    • Orcs should be supersticious

      So last night I lost a game to Greenskins. Those damned Orcs wrecking up my brave imperial soldiers... They must have a weakness!

      And then I had a dream that Orcs were quite supersticious. In my dream, they had taken over a small city in which there was a rather large arc at the city gates, the pride of the city. After the Orcs took it over, a white bird was sitting on the arc and, well, took a dumb that landed on an orc's head. This was seen as a bad omen and the Orcs soon abandoned the city.

      The orcs really come across to me as the kind of people that would heed the advice of chicken bones tossed around in a bowl by a shaman and so it follows that they should be rather supersticious and heed omens and signs of luck. Theoretically, you might even be able to ward off Orcs with the proper setup and signs, though I'd imagine that most other races would have a hard time to figure out exactly what the Orcs think and it might vary from tribe to tribe.

      So that's my idea and suggestion for T9A fluff. Whaddaya think? :whistling:
    • yhandros wrote:

      In 40k 3rd 4th edition ork machinery and weapons did work only because the orks believed it should work.
      And all the other races were wondering how such things were possible.
      Shooting Goblins/Grotz through tiny Wormholes using a weapon that barely holds together. Simply attaching rocket thrusters to a hollow meteor and using this "space ship" to perform inter-dimensional" warp travel??
      Sounds sbout right! :orclaugh:
    • umbranar wrote:

      Aint it in the 40k lore that Orcs protect themselves and stuff by painting it blue and it works because they believe it does and some strange thing happens? Yellow blows up better, red moves faster etc?
      As far as I understand it, Orks in 40K have some sort of mind powers (that they are unaware of) that can change reality in such ways if a sufficient amount of them believe it.
    • SnakeEyes wrote:

      And all the other races were wondering how such things were possible.
      I remember than when I played, that theory was proposed "in-game" by the Adeptus Mechanicus. Y'know, the ones obviously well known for their great inventions and leaps of scientific understanding...

      (I've always prefered the idea that the orkish psychic field acts as lubricants, making the machinery that bit more smoother and unreliable things more reliable, but not on the level of "this shouldn't work, but it does, and this stick shoots bullets because the orks thinks it's a gun". That's just juvenile and retarded... I expect that the official position has since changed, and not in opposition to the "retard with a stick" theory)
      Don't hoard the fluff. The fluff wants to be free!

      A local blog of sorts for what I'm modelling, converting and painting that's related to 9th age can be found here
    • Hombre de Mundo wrote:

      umbranar wrote:

      Aint it in the 40k lore that Orcs protect themselves and stuff by painting it blue and it works because they believe it does and some strange thing happens? Yellow blows up better, red moves faster etc?
      As far as I understand it, Orks in 40K have some sort of mind powers (that they are unaware of) that can change reality in such ways if a sufficient amount of them believe it.
      I have read a lot of stuff about 40k orks and overall lore. In 40k (and in FB) the true belief (unconditional and pure) can make stuff happen. In case of orks - their mentality and psychic field makes this process even more powerful. So if enough orks believe in something - it starts to manifest into reality. The problem is - not so much beings in universe can have so powerful ability to believe into something without even remote drop of critical thinking.
    • I feel like superstition is pretty universal. The most civilized groups like Rome and China were very superstitious. The least civilized tribes were also superstitious. Seems to be a human thing.

      I would argue Warhammer style orcs are relatively practical. I see them as bold and direct risk takers. If a bird poops on you, you wipe it off and keep going about your business. Unlike humans they haven't assumed that the bird was trying to warn them about a misfortune to come. They just think it needed to go and didn't care who got hit.
    • Yes, in a fantasy setting with magic. ghosts and religion being large parts of life, superstition is bound to exist all over the place but I think the Orcs should act in ways that a human would scoff at as superstition.

      So for instance, there's a difference between avoiding black cats or graveyards and consulting chicken bones for which direction to go when raiding.
    • Col. Tartleton wrote:

      I feel like superstition is pretty universal. The most civilized groups like Rome and China were very superstitious. The least civilized tribes were also superstitious. Seems to be a human thing.

      I would argue Warhammer style orcs are relatively practical. I see them as bold and direct risk takers. If a bird poops on you, you wipe it off and keep going about your business. Unlike humans they haven't assumed that the bird was trying to warn them about a misfortune to come. They just think it needed to go and didn't care who got hit.
      I am afraid that if bird would be foolish enough to poop on the ork - he will find her if only to beat living crap out of her.
    • Happy Aspid wrote:

      Col. Tartleton wrote:

      I feel like superstition is pretty universal. The most civilized groups like Rome and China were very superstitious. The least civilized tribes were also superstitious. Seems to be a human thing.

      I would argue Warhammer style orcs are relatively practical. I see them as bold and direct risk takers. If a bird poops on you, you wipe it off and keep going about your business. Unlike humans they haven't assumed that the bird was trying to warn them about a misfortune to come. They just think it needed to go and didn't care who got hit.
      I am afraid that if bird would be foolish enough to poop on the ork - he will find her if only to beat living crap out of her.
      I think the nearest goblin will laugh his butt off and the goblin gets to wipe the poop with his face before becoming a throwing weapon.
      :UD_bw: :WDG: :DE:
    • umbranar wrote:

      Happy Aspid wrote:

      Col. Tartleton wrote:

      I feel like superstition is pretty universal. The most civilized groups like Rome and China were very superstitious. The least civilized tribes were also superstitious. Seems to be a human thing.

      I would argue Warhammer style orcs are relatively practical. I see them as bold and direct risk takers. If a bird poops on you, you wipe it off and keep going about your business. Unlike humans they haven't assumed that the bird was trying to warn them about a misfortune to come. They just think it needed to go and didn't care who got hit.
      I am afraid that if bird would be foolish enough to poop on the ork - he will find her if only to beat living crap out of her.
      I think the nearest goblin will laugh his butt off and the goblin gets to wipe the poop with his face before becoming a throwing weapon.
      Something like that?
      2.bp.blogspot.com/--6ebcUzM_1A…/s1600/dwarfRoachShot.jpg
    • New

      FlyingScanian wrote:


      (I've always prefered the idea that the orkish psychic field acts as lubricants, making the machinery that bit more smoother and unreliable things more reliable, but not on the level of "this shouldn't work, but it does, and this stick shoots bullets because the orks thinks it's a gun". That's just juvenile and retarded... I expect that the official position has since changed, and not in opposition to the "retard with a stick" theory)
      That's how I understood it all along. No amount of belief would make an ork capable of shooting real bullets with a toy gun. In the game, the oft-quoted belief that red vehicles are faster makes them actually faster by a grand total of one inch per turn.
      Sunna is not with the big battalions, but with the ones whose parts move with the best coordination.
    • New

      I mean that was supposed to be a crackpot in universe theory by an organization that thinks the oil makes the wheel stop squeaking because it's holy oil blessed by a minister of the machine faith. The joke is that they don't understand how the Ork technology works *without* superstitious magic rituals.

      I prefer to think the orks paint things that are faster red and things that are shootier yellow and lucky things blue and brutal things with checkerboards because it looks cool.

      You put a new turbo on the engine and realied that you would be way more likely to get the enemies' attention (any self respecting Ork's goal) by painting it with bright red paint.

      Humans don't understand why Orks have better tech than them... I mean they're Xenos and stupid Xenos at that.
    • New

      FlyingScanian wrote:

      SnakeEyes wrote:

      And all the other races were wondering how such things were possible.
      I remember than when I played, that theory was proposed "in-game" by the Adeptus Mechanicus. Y'know, the ones obviously well known for their great inventions and leaps of scientific understanding...
      (I've always prefered the idea that the orkish psychic field acts as lubricants, making the machinery that bit more smoother and unreliable things more reliable, but not on the level of "this shouldn't work, but it does, and this stick shoots bullets because the orks thinks it's a gun". That's just juvenile and retarded... I expect that the official position has since changed, and not in opposition to the "retard with a stick" theory)
      Yes this has been retconned since. But it can also be invoked for comic relief reasons. I remember once, we and some internet friends were writing a "fan story" turn by turn about our characters fighting each others on a forum. One of my friends had his sneaky commando Warboss cornered in a spaceship cargo room with nowhere to go and he focused on the light on/off switch on the wall near him. He convinced himself so hard that it commanded the opening of the cargo airlock that when he used it, it opened the airlock and flushed out all the space marines in space. It was super funny and unexpected.

      But yes, I always prefered to think of it like you do: a kind of a psychic lubricant.

      Col. Tartleton wrote:

      I feel like superstition is pretty universal. The most civilized groups like Rome and China were very superstitious. The least civilized tribes were also superstitious. Seems to be a human thing.

      I would argue Warhammer style orcs are relatively practical. I see them as bold and direct risk takers. If a bird poops on you, you wipe it off and keep going about your business. Unlike humans they haven't assumed that the bird was trying to warn them about a misfortune to come. They just think it needed to go and didn't care who got hit.
      Yes, you are right. I prefer to see Orcs as rather practical. Anyway, they're certainly not the kind of being impressed by the flight of birds or when they crap on their heads.

      Savage Orcs are supersticious to the point of thinking that their tatoos grant them magical protection and it does make it true. However, the more civilised Orcs are a lot less impressed by that kind of stuff and if I remember correctly, they barely tolerate the bouts of crazy dancing and speech from their shamans because they recognise their power and their connection to Gork and Mork.

      Black Orcs are always described as being killjoy and intensely practical. I would keep this that way for T9A Iron Orcs. That would leave them a lot more menacing. Orc comic relief is fun, but Iron Orc should never be the laughing stock of anyone.
      Armies:


      • Orcs & Goblins
      • Kingdom of Breton.. ah! I mean Equitaine! ;)