Armies of Fluff: because narration is important

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    • Ok, time to talk again about characters creation.

      About this I have only one very strict rule, while the others are just... let's call them "basic ideas to start with".

      The rule is: never standardise the way you create characters. A creative process cannot - and should not - be engineered. The more you "standardise" it, the more the result will be redundant and boring.


      Now, there are different "first steps" you can start with. Some examples:

      - a specific miniature you created;
      - a specific function from the background (i.e.: a Dread Prince);
      - a mythological or historical individual you want to translate into the setting;
      - an alter ego of yourself translated on the battlefield (well, actually some way or the other, this inevitably happens, more or less indireclty, in all of your creations);
      - the decision of collecting a new army;
      - you simply need to create something/someone;
      - etc. etc..

      As we already said, the two main fundamentals of a character are "being interesting" and "being consistent with the context".

      "Being interesting" is highly subjective, it really depends on your tastes and their complexity. I personally, for example, need to see some depth and multidimensional psychology in my characters. This doesn't really mean you need to write three hundred pages to describe them. Remember: sometimes simple symbols and a few words can say more than hundred pages. Some other times, what you don't say about a character can be more meaningful than what you say. It is not really different from the character creation process of a roleplaying game, but you have - around your protagonist - a whole army that can help shape his "resume".

      The main issue about creating someone interesting is making him somewhat "exceptional", but not too much. In my opinion, the absolute exception is never really interesting, nor easy to identify with. So, personally, for every "exceptional feat" I try to set up a draw back or a trait that relegate the character again into "normality". This should generally create some balance, making the individual more consistend and believable.

      The second point, "being consistent with the context", is something extremely interesting into the setting is being created in T9A. Our context is in fact somewhat open. Which is actually why you don't really see, into our world map, proper national limits. This is because apart from the "general plot" (main nations, cities, geographical locations) the setting is open enough to allow you to create your personal marshal of the Empire of Sonnstahl, or your personal Duke of an equitanian border mark. On the other hand, there's a lot of "not mentioned themes". "Not mentioned" means while they are not "usual", they are also not automatically "excluded" from the setting. They are, simply, extremely rare. The more you want to be consistent with the context, nonetheless, the more you can underline the "limits" intrinsic into the setting. For example, magical object are relatively rare and magical powers are connected with specific magical energies that are hard to find and harder to manage (so: no people flying all around the place constantly, and no atomic bomb-like magical artefacts).





      This for now. Next episode: how I'm planning the characters and story of my new BH army (with maximum despair of my wife, for there's no more space in our place and I'm going to spend a lot of money on Mierce Miniatures).




      (in pic: Samael, my oldest cat, which will be the inspiration for my Minotaur Warlord behaviour)


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      A jackal, O Karna, residing in the forest in the midst of hares regardeth himself a lion till he actually sees a lion.




      Armies of Fluff: because narration is important - a blog about fluffing your army.
      Armies of Fluff: repository of my unofficial short stories and excerpts

      :WDG_bw: :VC: :O&G: :EoS: :BH: :DE:
    • One question (since my definition of "fluffy army" is possibly somewhat different from the general one used here...):

      How do you deal with your characters dying? Ignore it (doesn't that run counter to the very idea of a story)? Claim it was just a grievious wound and s/he got better (works about twice imho...)? Accept that that character is dead, create new character for that position (and what do you then do with the model for that character)?
      Don't hoard the fluff. The fluff wants to be free!

      A local blog of sorts for what I'm modelling, converting and painting that's related to 9th age can be found here
    • The problem is that in my experience, statistically, there is really a, say, 40 % of a given character to die every battle.
      So you can't really recreate a new character every time.


      Personally, I always take the table from Mighty Empires.

      Roll a die and :

      1 : Dead
      2-3 Wounded
      4-5 : Stunned –> if his side won the battle, he is unscathed ; if his side lost the battle, then he is captured by the enemy !
      6 : It's just a flesh wound !

      Wound :

      2DWound typeRecovery timePenalty while recoveringPermanent
      2Severe Armwhole seasonout of action-2 Off/Def, amputation (can't use Shield and
      two-handed weapons)
      3Light Arm1 turn-3 Off/Deff and -2 Str/PA
      4Critical Headwhole seasonout of action-2 Agi, -1 Dis
      5Severe Head3 turnsout of action-1 Agi
      6Light Head2 turns-1 HP/Agi and -2 Off/Def/Accuracy
      7Superficial Head1 turn
      -1 HP/Off/Def/Accuracy
      8Light Body2 turns-1 Str/AP/Res/HP
      9Severe Body3 turnsout of action-1 Res
      10Critical Bodywhole seasonout of action-2 Res, -1 Str/AP/HP
      11Light Leg1 turnAdv/Mar ÷ 2
      12Severe Legwhole seasonout of actionCrippled : Adv/Mar ÷ 2




      By the way, don't ask me what is a « turn » ;) :largegrin:
      GHAÂAÂAÂARN ! — The Black Goat of the Woods with a Thousand Young
      First T9A player in West Africa
    • FlyingScanian wrote:

      One question (since my definition of "fluffy army" is possibly somewhat different from the general one used here...):

      How do you deal with your characters dying? Ignore it (doesn't that run counter to the very idea of a story)? Claim it was just a grievious wound and s/he got better (works about twice imho...)? Accept that that character is dead, create new character for that position (and what do you then do with the model for that character)?
      Well put, my friend: that's the kind of questions I really like to read here!


      I would say there are different answers to your question, it really depends on the degree of abstraction one applies to single battles.

      I, for example, am extremely strict on proxy policies, but apply an high degree of abstraction to single battles, since I play a lot.

      So, to put it in facts: I'm restructuring my old 5th/6th edition DE army. My raptors are still those with the highest level of "stupidity" in the aesthetics (godzilla like), and I never mix other raptors. I have 3 different sorceress on foot, one for Witchcraft, one for divination and one for cosmology. I don't like my characters to have different mounts, since I found it not really realistic (you need a lot of time and efforts to develop a good training and feeling with a combat mount), so I have one character on dragon, one on raptor and one on chariot and I consider them to be different characters. I have different Cult Priest and three "dread princess" on foot (well, I expect to put one of them on a chariot) to allow me to build up "cult armies". I actually don't play Dancers of Yema since I don't have any model to represent them and, even if I own a lot of old beloved metal Witch Elves, I use them as Blades of Nabh but I refuse to use them as Dancers. :D

      On the other hand, while on normal casual and tournament play, I consider them as "removed from the battlefield", unless they constantly prove to be exceptionally unlucky. In such cases, I try to find a new character/miniature.

      In Campaign Play (which is unfortunately rare these times here in Rome)... well, that's another story, because the focus is on the story and if you're gonna lose your general... the best thing is as suggested by @Ghiznuk some sort of fluffy rule.





      Another option is to "fluffize" your army as a whole, but to keep "anonimity" on your characters on the battlefield. Meaning you play that army from that cult, lead by a powerful character that you don't really see on the battlefield. That way you are free to make your army strongly thematic, but at the same time you are free to use any "subordinate" officer and sacrifice him/her. And, why not, even punish them for their failure.

      Display Spoiler

      A jackal, O Karna, residing in the forest in the midst of hares regardeth himself a lion till he actually sees a lion.




      Armies of Fluff: because narration is important - a blog about fluffing your army.
      Armies of Fluff: repository of my unofficial short stories and excerpts

      :WDG_bw: :VC: :O&G: :EoS: :BH: :DE:
    • I cop out and write down an injury or an epic defeat on the battle report... I aint GRR martin, i cant keep coming up with characters to keep my fluff castles afloat on their clouds while im twiddling with the detalia about what my war time cooks can plausibly conjure to feed my legions on the march...
      I invite you to choke on my pointy ears \ >_o/
      Phae's Pointy-Ear Blog: Elves in a Corner
    • chronicle of a new army - building up the plot

      Ok, after all this theoretical chit-chatting, let's go with some ideas.

      Disclaimer: please remember that this user-blog is based upon my ideas to create personal fluff and in no ways what I write here is to be considered "canon" of the background/setting of T9A. The idea beyond this blog is to give example on how to fit your fluff into the general setting.


      Several weeks ago I decided to change my playstyle. I'm no pro, as said, but I'm trying to improve my skills. What I've noticed is that while playing WdG, DE and VC I'm always hesitant and prone to a defensive playstyle. Yes, even with WdG. To force my hand toward a more offensive modus operandi, I've decided to start playing with the only army (IMO) you cannot really defend your position with: the Beast Herds.

      The first issue with that is: the classic Beastmen from GW never really matched my taste. On the other hand, the new fluff (you got some intro to it in Scroll no.9) is really interesting and, also, I always felt attracted by theriantropy both in fantasy literature and European folklore and pre-christian mythology. Luckily, the huge range by Mierce came to my mind (...and I will take the chance to remember you that @Tim 'Bananaman' FIsher launched a discount on BH models until monday, right here)...

      Here came the second issue: I generally fall in love with "caotic" armies. I mean, not really "chaotic", but "realistic". Let me explain: real armies are never perfectly ordered, they are a bit messy. It's war, guys, you don't really pay attention to your uniform when you're at war. This was especially true in medieval and ancient armies. While our image of the roman army - for example - forged on the images on the Trajan Column, brought us to think of an entire army equipped with the Lorica Segmentata, we actually know that it was a bit messier, with the legions wearing several, different kinds of loricae.

      So, I want some diversity. And since Mierce and other manufacturers have a lot of different "subraces" of beastmen, I fell in love with a lot of them. Too many, actually.

      How can I give some consistency and coherency to an army with mammoth and hyppos-like Gortachs and walrus, gorilla, werewolf-like minotaurs (proxies)?

      As I've said before, in our setting there are "open spaces", let's call them "intentional holes", unspecified points. This is to allow people to set their own fluff into the setting. So, while we know that the BH are generally bovidae, there's nothing stating that the main magical procedure at the very core of the BH creation, the womb-marking (again: see scroll no.9), cannot be applied by "mad soothsayers" to other species.

      As it's often said in archaeology, the lack of evidence is no evidence in itself.


      Thus, the first basic principle for my army:

      "womb-marking" have been applied outside the common culture/structure of the BH to create non-bovidae beastmen.


      Another issue is of course geography. Werewolves, werebears, walrus and mammoths are easy to connect in an hypotetical near-artic region, let's say the extreme north of Vetia. But hyppos, elephant and rhinos?

      Well, the answer here is to look for an example of migrating population, which is something really easy to find if you look at historical context. My take is to get a mix of norsemen and goths.



      Second principle, then:

      my army is a raiding, constantly moving army, possibly through the seas. This will give the chance to my soothsayers to "womb-mark" different creatures to create different beastmen.



      Unfortunately I'm that kind of person that become easily addicted to new ideas. Wandering for a few weeks on Mierce's site and also on other sites, I fell in love with several minis. Particularly, taking the chance of a discount, I fell in love with these two:

      - Penda
      - Kernuor



      Particularly, Penda attracted me because he is a man with only an hand "bestialized". Also, Kernuor, as all the Ysians (the faction he belongs to in Darklands), fell in the most depraved cult of Kernunnos, the celtic horned god. All this really inspired me to keep into the army a more traditional feeling of theriantropy, mixing up it's fantasy version (so pure beastmen) and symbolical theriantropy (think of initiatory "bestial" cults, or "transfigured" men such as ulfdnhir and berserkir).



      So, I have now a third principle, that will set the general theme of the army, and I've called it

      the beast within, the beast without: the womb-markings applied generated an host of half men - half beast with a wide range of "degree of success": some of them are men outside, beast inside, while some are "totally beast".



      Looking at Pena and Kernuor (I will of course change their names), I came up also with the idea that the heroes of the army should probably be the roots the army was created upon, the roots of this wandering army, and being a "raiding" army, the best thing to came up with is to make them originally from the most "viking/goth" faction of our setting: they were originally Asklanders.


      It's not a case I mentioned the Goths. Not only because of their migrations, but also because I always try to give the fluff a root into mythology, which means a root into ancient languages. I also try to take some mythological characters or traditional poems as examples. In this case, I decided to use the Old Gothic language and use as partial inspiration the Gutasaga, since the place of origin of this Saga, Gotland (a swedish Island in the Baltic) is special to me and I loved a place over there, a "cairn" called Uggarde Rojr, which is a very gloomy place if you visit it by night.

      I dived into my books of compared mythology and languages and I came up with a name for my army:

      Diuzis Drauhts, that in Old gothic means - more or less - Host of wild beasts.


      Following the Gutasaga, in which the three inheritors of Tjelvar (who discovered Gotland) took the command of Gotland (one third of the land each), I've decided to set up three main heroes into my Saga/Army.

      - The miniature of Kernuor will become Astaths (="Truth" in Gothic), the Soothsayer.
      - The miniature of Penda will become a Beast warlord, called Driugan (="to wage war")
      - This miniature will become a Minotaur warlord, called Godakund (="of noble birth").

      These three will become the original three Asklanders turned to wild beast (or better, half beast) and thus the "pivots" of the fluff. To give them the chance to develop the necessary knowledge to lead a maritime raiding force, I've decided that they were "womb-marked" but their "transformation" manifested later in their adulthood, with Astaths keeping his human form, Driugan being only partially transformed and Godakund completely turned into a Wolf-man.


      As a medium for the fluff, since both BH and Asklanders (presumably) love to "tell" stories, I will create for the army a Saga, that I will probably call HATISSAGA (the Saga of Wrath).


      Next issues to be solved:

      - how they became beasts and developed theriantropy?

      - how did Astaths, the soothsayer, learned to "womb-mark"?


      _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________




      closing art:


      Jakub Rebelka - Morning Star


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      A jackal, O Karna, residing in the forest in the midst of hares regardeth himself a lion till he actually sees a lion.




      Armies of Fluff: because narration is important - a blog about fluffing your army.
      Armies of Fluff: repository of my unofficial short stories and excerpts

      :WDG_bw: :VC: :O&G: :EoS: :BH: :DE:

      The post was edited 1 time, last by VisconteDimezzato ().

    • Time to develop something more about the Diuzis Drauhts.

      Now, one of the most discussed topic about fluff here on the forum is the perspective: third person, omniscient narrator OR in-world sources?

      That is a question such as those like "is Judo better than Karate?" or "Was a Colt M16 better than an AK47?" or "Is Poe better than Lovecraft?" (I can give a millions more examples...), meaning those questions you cannot really have a definitive answer if you look at them from a relistic, complex perspective.

      ...of course if you're dogmatic, you can strongly believe in one or the other answer, but reality is never dogmatically dualistic.

      I personally love both omniscient narrator in some cases and in-world sources in other cases.

      If I have to elaborate a more complete - but impossible to be exhaustive - answer, I would say an ominiscient narrator perspective is more suitable when you have to describe an extremely large context by making things easy for the reader. That is the way, for example, you find in the background pages of the Through the breach RPG 2nd edition manual, in which the whole history of the world of Malifaux is described. Through such a mean you can efficiently describe things fast and from the peculiar point of view of an all-seeing eye.

      Nonetheless, in some ways, such a "medium" is telling you everything, crystallizing the context and making it bidimensional.

      To make an explanatory metaphor: let's say your story is a picture you take with your excellent camera.

      You can look at this picture through different mediums: a very good screen, a cheaper screen, a black&white print, a grey-scale print, an extremely expensive professional print made after some editing with PS-pro.

      Using an omniscent narration is like printing the picture and deleting the file. You can print it cheap black&white if you are a good writer. Or if you are an exceptional writer, you can print your story-picture extremely professional, making its colors really alive.

      But in both cases, that picture will be for ever the same.

      On the other hand, you can choose the other way: let an in-world source or more sources "print" your picture. This way, it will always change in some details, being like a living myth that slighly changes every time the teller is different (or older). And perhaps you'll also realize that the very same story told by your drunk dwarf today is better than the very same story (you wrote) told by a human bard two years ago, since meanwhile your writing skills improved.

      This last is of course the way of small background excerpts based on in-world sources you find in manual and books from wargaming to RPGs.

      But it is also the more realistic way to represent a complex reality: you have different narrations of the very same fact. Interpretation, more than narrations.



      In the end, noone can really tell which one is the best way. It's up to you to find the way more appealing to you.


      (if you want to discuss such a topic, please do it constructively, this is not really the place to discuss the decided direction of the canonic background, since this is merely personal, unofficial takes on narration, thank you!)

      _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


      Another thing you should decide upon is how much of your story should be clear to the reader and what shouldn't.

      This is something you can plan initially or decide upon later. But in general the first thing I would suggest to do is to draft the main plot of your story/fluff of the army and then decide what should be directly defined and what should be left open to the reader's interpretation.

      Let's make an example with the Diuzis Drauhts.


      I've decided to give them a northern european feeling, meaning Asklanders in Vetia.

      Why did some Asklanders developed a BH-like therianthropy? And how did they keep their cultural roots?

      Before the birth of the leaders of the Drauhts, and of many of their followers, several strange raids were conducted, presumably by a warherd - against dozens of smaller Asklanders villages. Such raids were not particularly destructive, unless matched with enough resistance, but they mostly aimed at raiding resources and - quite strange happening - pregnant women.

      The raid were made by a small herd lead by a soothsayer. All the kidnapped women were eventually given drugs and wombmarked, to be later freed after a few weeks near a coastal Asklanders village. They all remained there since the original villages refused to accept them back, for they believed them to be now impure.

      The village they now lived in was lead by a blind seidrkennar, called Tjelvar.

      After some years, the newlyborn being adolescent, they started to develop non-human capabilities, or non-human physical features, meanwhile their mothers dying relatively young as a result of the womb-marking.

      The seidrkennar lead the adolescent to discover and in some way accept their "marked" status, especially as they met other asklanders that refused to accept them, calling them Diuzis, Beasts.

      When the oldest of them (by a few weeks), Astaths, had his first nightmarish and beastly vision, Tjelvar lead him into the forest, showed his true nature of half beast (so the was the soothsayer that kidnapped their mothers) to Astaths and announced he will have to take care spiritually of the others and their transformation for the coming future.


      _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

      Having drafted the basic events that lead to the creation of the army, even if it still lacks motivations, background of Tjelvar and alikes, let's see what I would like to be clear to the reader and how.

      I will copy/paste the same text, now colour-coding it like:

      - Green: information available to the reader through the Hatissaga (source internal to the army)
      - Red: information not available to the reader at least at the beginning of the narration (nothing forbid you to make info available in the future, for example)
      - Blue: information available to the reader through the filter of an enemy source

      Before the birth of the leaders of the Drauhts, and of many of their followers, several strange raids were conducted, presumably by a warherd - against dozens of smaller Asklanders villages. Such raids were not particularly destructive, unless matched with enough resistance, but they mostly aimed at raiding resources and - quite strange happening - pregnant women.

      The raid were made by a small herd lead by a soothsayer. All the kidnapped women were eventually given drugs and wombmarked, to be later freed after a few weeks near a coastal Asklanders village. They all remained there since the original villages refused to accept them back, for they believed them to be now impure.

      The village they now lived in was lead by a blind seidrkennar, called Tjelvar.

      After some years, the newlyborn being adolescent, they started to develop non-human capabilities, or non-human physical features, meanwhile their mothers dying relatively young as a result of the womb-marking.

      The seidrkennar lead the adolescent to discover and in some way accept their "marked" status
      , especially as they met other asklanders that refused to accept them, calling them Diuzis, Beasts.

      When the oldest of them (by a few weeks), Astaths, had his first nightmarish and beastly vision, Tjelvar lead him into the forest, showed his true nature of half beast (so the was the soothsayer that kidnapped their mothers) to Astaths and announced he will have to take care spiritually of the others and their transformation for the coming future.


      In the future, on these distinctions I will create ad hoc in-world sources to build up different narrations on the same fact.

      _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________




      Mythological inspiration paragraph: in this picture, Theoderic the Great or Dietrich von Bern, the gothic king that reigned in Italy. This is from the San Zeno Basilica in Verona, and represents Theoderic as an Huntsman, one of the main all-european legends connected to the mythological archetype of the wild huntsman/wild hunt. Also see: Þiðrekssaga.

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      A jackal, O Karna, residing in the forest in the midst of hares regardeth himself a lion till he actually sees a lion.




      Armies of Fluff: because narration is important - a blog about fluffing your army.
      Armies of Fluff: repository of my unofficial short stories and excerpts

      :WDG_bw: :VC: :O&G: :EoS: :BH: :DE:
    • Had some inspiration tonight to write a few words from a third party source.


      Here we go then:



      There’s a second, during sunset, in which darkness and light, day and night, mix themselves toghether, becoming the very same thing. In that second, the beast and the man conjoined. It is in that second that they showed their reality, as they call it, the Mark of the Beast, something that goes far beyond the understanding of a man, and as far as I know, even beyond that of a beast. In that second, when light is not enough to see clearly, and darkness is not enough to allow the torches to shine, they assaulted our camp. Some of them were fast and perfectly coordinated like a pack of wolves. Some were stronger than bears. The biggest of them had the eight of three men, and they were litereally tearing apart some of our chariots, and ripping to pieces our – totally useless – artillery.

      No man can be so fast or strong. No beast can be so tactically prepared. For what we know today, after being their prisoners, is that they are not beasts, nor men. The Beast Herds abhor them, mankind fears them. Unaccepted, doomed, exiled, such is the tragedy they made their own distinctive trait, the foundation on which they built the fortress of their strongest will: surviving as outcasts was not enough, they wanted to live.

      The Beast within: those of them appearing as men, with the instincts and invisible features of an animal, such as strenght, speed, agility.
      The Beast without: those of them appearing as animals, while keeping internally their human nature, able to talk, to have human feelings.

      They call themselves Diuzis Drauhts, the Host of Beasts, in the old language of the Asklanders, for from the lands of the North they came, and they travelled across Vetia and Taphria and Augea to meet those akin to them, to give the outcasts and the exiled a new chance, a new life, under the sign of a new god, under the lead of a prophet, a soothsayer, the one they call Astaths, Truth.

      (The nature of the werebeasts, from the Memories of Boris Van Arandij, Volskaian explorer)








      _____________________________________________________________________________________________________


      ...meanwhile, happy night of the dead.




      (Lo Stregozzo, by Marcantonio Raimondi and Agostino Veneziano, circa 1527)

      Display Spoiler

      A jackal, O Karna, residing in the forest in the midst of hares regardeth himself a lion till he actually sees a lion.




      Armies of Fluff: because narration is important - a blog about fluffing your army.
      Armies of Fluff: repository of my unofficial short stories and excerpts

      :WDG_bw: :VC: :O&G: :EoS: :BH: :DE:
    • Time to go deeper into the construction of the main characters, then.

      I've started writing some verses for the Hatissaga, namely the origins of the Drauhts. I've decided to give the three main characters some redundance in description. This help identifying them within a common pattern, let's call it "initiatory path", but at the same time differentiating their role into the story.

      In my story there's a recurring number, 9. All of the "children", and thus also our three protagonists, are born from women kidnapped for nine days and nine nights. Of course the reference is to Odhinn's nine nights on the Yggdrasil and the runic initiation, a theme that I would like to insert into the story as path of selfsacrifice to acquire knowledge and higher counsciousness.

      The discovery of their nature is also divided in phases of nine years each. At this point in the story we are in the first phase, or the ninth year, when each of them start to develop their own future role into the Drauhts. all of them are brought by Tjelvar, the initiator, into the forest, but with different timings. One during both night and day (knowledge of duality) and the other two during sunset and sunrise (so opposite characters: one is furious, the other is calm and prone to reasoned tactics and strategy).

      Meanwhile I've decided to split the user blog in two parts:

      in this one (the real user blog) you'll find ideas, comment and alikes. In the other one, in the background section of the general forum, you'll find the stories I write.

      Enjoy them here, then:


      Armies of Fluff: repository of my unofficial background-related stories.



      ______________________________________________________________

      When we quit thinking primarily about ourselves and our own self-preservation, we undergo a truly heroic transformation of consciousness. Joseph Campbell




      (Svetlana Ignatova - Simurgh)

      Display Spoiler

      A jackal, O Karna, residing in the forest in the midst of hares regardeth himself a lion till he actually sees a lion.




      Armies of Fluff: because narration is important - a blog about fluffing your army.
      Armies of Fluff: repository of my unofficial short stories and excerpts

      :WDG_bw: :VC: :O&G: :EoS: :BH: :DE:
    • Time to develop some more fluff.

      In the last days, while thinking about developing some more longer texts in italian about the Diuzis, I also thought about the "Mark" of the "beast within - beast without" and its working pattern.

      Issues to be solved:

      - the Diuzis have several "beast" pattern coming from different continents, but the "raiding" theme on itself doesn't explain why the first generation of half beast (the protagonists) can still be fighting while some other new entries are already adults. That means that some of the reinforcements from other countries were already adults when joined the army

      - the Diuzis should be adapted to the BH books, so I have to differentiate infantry units, particularly mongrels from wildhorns and wildhorns from longhorns.


      For the first issues, I've decided that the original magical force used to womb mark the first generation was not exclusive of that geographical area. Other soothsayers - outcasts from other herds - used it all across the continents. What the Diuzis cannot really explain, but they take it as a matter of fact, is how they are attracted, even across the seas, by other individuals of their kin, so half men-half beast, but outcast from commond BH. It's like the theriantropy they are subjected to make them all outcast from both human and BH main societies, but "genetically" create a brethren that attract all of them even from hundreds of kilometers.

      I've also decided that such a magical procedure, when not failing tragically, gives them not only animal like features, but also makes their lives longer, making them live around 120 years, allowing the oldest of them to fight until their 100s.

      This will allow me to make them meet some very old "monsters", such as one of the Gortach in Rhino's form, being something like 90 years old, thus allowing me creating an entire story about him and his curse in another continents (Taphria).

      About the second issue, I should probably define three different levels of theriantropy.

      For mongrels, I've decided that the mark manifests itself in two different ways:

      - with small changes to the human shape, basically leaving men and women unchanged outside, but giving them little animal feat, such as better resilience (not the in-game characteristics) and speed.
      - changing common men and women into smaller creatures, such as ratmen and gnolls.

      This will allow me to have huge caotic units made with Frostgrave models (both human and gnolls) and older plastic rats from WHFB, all of them on 20mm bases of course.

      Wildhorn will be stronger creatures, mainly human-like but showing hardcore changes in their outside shape. For now I will use GW Tzaangors and beastmen, but I'm still looking around for some alternatives (possibly cheap, given the high model counts).

      For the longhorns, well, fluffing elite units is often easier and a more satisfying process. Longhorns are the real veterans, stubborn big guys in a wild army, the real bodyguard of the commanders.

      In the Diuzis, the Longhorns are those with the most hardcore version of the mark, something that is like a possession, they are like animals trapped inside a human body, with a magical energy still active able to adapt and change to outer environment and, in some cases, absorb outside totemic objects, such as armours and weapons. For them, I've decided to use the infantry units of the Ysians from Mierce Miniatures, so they will be both horned males and blind females. And of course, they will be the original Diuzis, the first generation of mutated asklanders.








      (Oksana Dimitrenko - Friends)

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      A jackal, O Karna, residing in the forest in the midst of hares regardeth himself a lion till he actually sees a lion.




      Armies of Fluff: because narration is important - a blog about fluffing your army.
      Armies of Fluff: repository of my unofficial short stories and excerpts

      :WDG_bw: :VC: :O&G: :EoS: :BH: :DE: