MrMossevig's newbie KoE blog

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    The brand new army book for Infernal Dwarves is finally available, along with a small surprise! Remember that it is a beta version, and provide us your feedback!

    • Bows for Yeoman Outriders

      Adding bows as a final touch to my Yeomen. I see that a lot of you are actually running them with throwing weapons instead, but hey. Anyways, the bows come from Essex Miniatures and looks like this:

      The painting was fairly straightforward. I decided to paint them before mounting them but both ways would probably be fine.
      Priming:

      Painting:

      I really wanted to mount them on the saddle so that they don't obstruct the rider in close combat but I was unable to find a good place for them, they always look off:

      So I decided to mount them on the back of the riders instead: Drilling a small notch where I wanted them to go.

      Using a power drill is a really bad idea. Use a proper tool instead. Then drying them all on their face so the bows get fixed in the right place:

      Aaaand we're done:



      If I were to do the Yeomen again I would probably converted one unit to throwing spears. I think that could easily be done by stripping the weapon hands and adding some javelins from Fireforge. Then cutting the lance above the hand and mount it upward in from the saddle. I think that would look like a really cool Yeomen unit. Damn, now I feel that I almost have to do another Yeomen unit.
      Currently posting a lot of Dread Elf WIP pictures over at: MrMossevig's Painting League 2019 - The Year of the Dragon

      My previous KoE project and complete army pictures: Army of Celeste

      The post was edited 1 time, last by mrmossevig ().

    • Dan wrote:

      Lovely progress.

      I swear to you I've tipped over those extra tall pots of wash 3 times now. Talk about clean up with those stupid things. My painting desk looked like an oil tanker ran aground.
      Thanks. Yes, I too have a wooden desk in all shades of grey now :)

      Klexe wrote:

      yep I also manged to wash 1 shirt from me ;)

      You don't really see it if you don't know it because it has somewhat the same muster :)
      Good idea :) I should really get one of those t-shirts too...
      Currently posting a lot of Dread Elf WIP pictures over at: MrMossevig's Painting League 2019 - The Year of the Dragon

      My previous KoE project and complete army pictures: Army of Celeste
    • Sealing those dudes

      The last step of my painting process is to get the shine of all the different elements (horse, wash, transfer, armor) to the right level. And preferably the same level (except for the armor). This can obviously be done by coating the model with a matt/satin varnish so my first thought was that maybe the GW Purity Seal could be a good option?

      However, researching further shows that these matt varnishes get a lot of bad rep across the internet, as they have a tendency to destroy the models by "fogging" them or creating a "milky" layer on top. Not something you want on your models that took forever to paint.

      The safest option is then of course to use brush-on varnish, so I ordered the 'Ardcoat for the gloss coat and Lahmian Medium for the matt varnish. I also did want to try to out a spray-on matt varnish, so after a lot of internet reading I settled on the Army Painter Anti-Shine Varnish. This topic was particular useful in selecting the matt spray-on varnish.

      As for the milky/fogging problems, below is a short description of my current understanding on how the problem arises. If anyone have better/other explanations, please let me know!

      Fogging/milky coating
      The fogging problem arises when the sprayed medium dries before it hits the miniature. The product is designed to cover the model completely with a wet coat, and then dry to create an even and matt surface layer. The sprays are optimized to work in a normal humidity, normal temperature environment and any deviation from this increases the chance of the sprayed particles drying before they hit the model, thus creating a milky effect. Particular environmental antagonists are high humidity, where the spray "collides" with water in the air before it hits the model, and low temperature which causes the spray to dry before it reaches the model.

      Another tip I received from @PunkMonk was to first cover the model with a gloss varnish. This will make the matt varnish flow better across the model to create an even layer. The other benefit of this is that the gloss varnishes seems to be harder, therefore sealing the model better for all eternity.

      So, enough of the intro, let's see some pictures!
      First I tried using only Ardcoat+Lahmian medium. Personally I did not like the result. It's hard to say exactly what was the problem was, but the colors looked much flatter. It might be that the Lahmian Medium adds a white-ish tone to the model. It is also clear that it's quite hard to get even coverage with a brush-on matt varnsih after a gloss coat. The reason is that it's impossible to see where you have applied varnish (both the covered and uncovered areas are shiny) so you're basically just applying it by feeling. Lahmian Medium on the left, Army Painter Anti-Shine on the right:

      It's very hard to tell any difference between them from this picture, but it does look like the Lahmian Medium is slightly shinier. And as noted before, the finish of the colors after Lahmian Medium is not something I recommend.

      So over to the Army Painter Anti-Shine. My set-up is by no means a perfect spray painting booth, it's the community washing room in my apartment building, but it's about the right temperature and does not fell humid. I decided to keep the varnish bottle in warm water to make sure it's hot enough to not dry before it reaches the target:

      Each of the dudes received five passes of the spray. One from front-right, one from rear-right, one from rear-left, one from front-left and one from the top. This seemed to give a good coverage from one layer, and not much difference could be seen by applying a second layer. One layer on the left, two layers on the right:

      Much better. Still enough of life, and everything has the "correct shine". The armor however looked a bit dull so I decided to freshen it up again with Ardcoat.
      Perfect. Protected for eternity. The big plus of doing this same procedure to all my models is that I know they're all going to look similar independently of what paints/washes I use.
      From left to right: Lahmian Medium; Two layers of AP Anti-Shine; One layer of AP Anti-Shine; Ardcoat before matt varnish:


      For the next models I will probably do the Ardcoating before adding the transfers. Then ardcoating over those again to make sure they're sealed and protected and finish with the matt varnish. So the complete procedure looks like:
      1) Ardcoat (5 min)
      2) Transfers (5 min)
      3) Ardcoat over transfers (1 min)
      4) Army Painter Anti-Shine (2 min)
      5) Ardcoat metal (1 min)

      I added the time I currently use for each of the steps. The time is per dude and includes set-up. For the Ardcoat and transfers, it's mostly just manual labour, but for the 4th step the time is mostly consumed by set-up. I probably spend a total of 20 mins coating 10 dudes.
      Currently posting a lot of Dread Elf WIP pictures over at: MrMossevig's Painting League 2019 - The Year of the Dragon

      My previous KoE project and complete army pictures: Army of Celeste
    • A blast from the past

      Christmas time!

      And what better way to spend Christmas than rummaging through the attic in search of a few desolate heroes? Growing up we bought the Warhammer starter pack with Lizardmen and Bretonnians. My older brother of course took the colorful horses while me and my younger brother had to split the remaining Lizardmen.

      So when I was back home for Christmas I decided to loot the attic of any remaining unpainted heroes of the old days. Lo and behold! Not only did I find one knight, I found a total of 13 unpainted knights, including a couple of 'Eavy Metal Grail Knights, standard bearers and musicians:

      I'm thinking that I'll use these for my Grail Knights, so it looks like the Grail Train will ride massively over-sized horses to battle. I only need 3 more and I have two complete Grail Trains. I also found 12 archers that I will probably never build. If anyone's interested, let me know:

      And then the "raisin in the sausage" (is this an expression in English too?), the mighty Paladin/Duke on a Pegasus:

      Another treat is the Bretonnia Army Book with lots of inspiration for painting and heraldry:

      And transfers:

      But I also found my old, long forgotten undead army. I did not have the space to bring the with me, so I left them in the tombs in the attic. I did however bring the Dire Wolves with me:

      After a quick rebasing and layer of varnish I have myself a decent set of knight unit fillers:)
      Currently posting a lot of Dread Elf WIP pictures over at: MrMossevig's Painting League 2019 - The Year of the Dragon

      My previous KoE project and complete army pictures: Army of Celeste

      The post was edited 1 time, last by mrmossevig ().

    • Oh god, seeing that army book again after all these years! 5th ed come out not long after I started playing and my best friend and I were the only kids around that played. He played Bretonnians, who were so ridiculously OP in that edition that I think I only won once in all the years we played those armies.
      I'm going to have nightmares about that stupid lance formation now.

      My flashbacks aside, great blog!

      My only tip regarding the paint build-up issue would be to thin your paints. It might take a few extra coats, but it tends to look way better.
      Oh and don't thin them with water, it dries like sh*t. I recommend Vallejo glaze medium for thinning; I'm no great painter but it made my paint jobs look a thousand times better.
      _____________________________________________________________________
      "You see only what the Tuatha De' allow you to see" - Queen Maeb
      Albiann - The Misted Isles, Homebrew Celtic Faction for T9A
      Full Army Book
    • QuothTheRaven wrote:

      Oh god, seeing that army book again after all these years! 5th ed come out not long after I started playing and my best friend and I were the only kids around that played. He played Bretonnians, who were so ridiculously OP in that edition that I think I only won once in all the years we played those armies.
      I'm going to have nightmares about that stupid lance formation now.

      My flashbacks aside, great blog!
      Thanks! Yeah, guess how many battle I won against my older brother playing Bretonnia :)

      QuothTheRaven wrote:

      My only tip regarding the paint build-up issue would be to thin your paints. It might take a few extra coats, but it tends to look way better.
      Oh and don't thin them with water, it dries like sh*t. I recommend Vallejo glaze medium for thinning; I'm no great painter but it made my paint jobs look a thousand times better.
      The best advice often comes from not-so-great-painters, as that advice is usually something that works for me :) I have actually heard this before and ignored this before... I guess I really have no choice anymore, but I'm afraid that not only does it take more time because I need more layers, but also because I can't use them straight out of the bottle anymore. Or do you actually thin them directly in the containers?
      Also, Vallejo glaze sounds like it would add some shine to the paint, that's not the case?
      Currently posting a lot of Dread Elf WIP pictures over at: MrMossevig's Painting League 2019 - The Year of the Dragon

      My previous KoE project and complete army pictures: Army of Celeste
    • mrmossevig wrote:

      QuothTheRaven wrote:

      Oh god, seeing that army book again after all these years! 5th ed come out not long after I started playing and my best friend and I were the only kids around that played. He played Bretonnians, who were so ridiculously OP in that edition that I think I only won once in all the years we played those armies.
      I'm going to have nightmares about that stupid lance formation now.

      My flashbacks aside, great blog!
      Thanks! Yeah, guess how many battle I won against my older brother playing Bretonnia :)

      QuothTheRaven wrote:

      My only tip regarding the paint build-up issue would be to thin your paints. It might take a few extra coats, but it tends to look way better.
      Oh and don't thin them with water, it dries like sh*t. I recommend Vallejo glaze medium for thinning; I'm no great painter but it made my paint jobs look a thousand times better.
      The best advice often comes from not-so-great-painters, as that advice is usually something that works for me :) I have actually heard this before and ignored this before... I guess I really have no choice anymore, but I'm afraid that not only does it take more time because I need more layers, but also because I can't use them straight out of the bottle anymore. Or do you actually thin them directly in the containers?Also, Vallejo glaze sounds like it would add some shine to the paint, that's not the case?
      I use a wet palette to thin paints on, it keeps them from drying out and if you use a sealable container, you can close it and use the same paint again for up to a week or so.

      My wet palette is just a bit of cleaning cloth in water with cooking parchment on top in a sealable container:


      I've not found that thinning paints slows me down much, but I'm not a fast painter in the first place.

      For a base colour I would only thin a little, maybe one drop of glaze medium to two drops of paint. highlight or shading layers i would use much thinner.

      I swear the Glaze medium is magic. It sounds like it should be gloss but it actually makes things look more matt and it has some ability to blend the edges for you.

      Another thing I've found it can do is if you dilute the paint or ink with it a lot, you can lightly wash an area and it will pull all the highlights together.
      _____________________________________________________________________
      "You see only what the Tuatha De' allow you to see" - Queen Maeb
      Albiann - The Misted Isles, Homebrew Celtic Faction for T9A
      Full Army Book
    • Sounds like I have to try out the wet palette then.. Is it possible to use the wet palette without watering down the paint? Or will the wet palette automatically water the down a bit?

      To be honest I don't think I can decrease my painting speed any more at the moment. Then I would never complete anything :) Maybe in the future, when I have a decent army already. By the way. I just watered down my first paint. It was a white I used to freshen up the transfers on the last knight I painted :)
      Currently posting a lot of Dread Elf WIP pictures over at: MrMossevig's Painting League 2019 - The Year of the Dragon

      My previous KoE project and complete army pictures: Army of Celeste
    • The main point of watering down the paint is to have I nice blend between different shades. And if couse so ya dudes smoothly with no brush strokes, but the first reason is the biggest. So if you don't layer different shades then don't worry about it yet. My yellows for example, start with averland sunset, then the yellow wash, then I layer yriel yellow, then layer the flash glitz yellow. Sometimes I don't even need to drybrush with the super light yellow dry paint to highlight edges because the layering comes out so good

      So if am you do is one shade of yellow for example and then a wash and it looks good, then you're done! That video I posted is a perfect example of what watering down the paint on your brush is for
    • The wet palette will keep the paint from drying out but I cannot stress enough the benefits of thinning the paint. Honestly just try it, it might not even slow you down as thinner paint dries faster.

      yellow is always a c*nt though,avoid it whenever possible. The best way I'vefound to do anything yellow is to have a solid white primer, yellow base then step down with orange/brown glazes. Washes won't cut it with yellow.
      _____________________________________________________________________
      "You see only what the Tuatha De' allow you to see" - Queen Maeb
      Albiann - The Misted Isles, Homebrew Celtic Faction for T9A
      Full Army Book
    • Black and White

      The only thing I'm now a bit disappointed in with the Teutonic knights is the variation of crests on the helmets. I's only horns in different shapes. Ideally I would have wished for more fantasy-inspired crests like dragons, swans. But I do not want them to get ridiculous. I still want my heroes to look like killers, so it might be better to stick with more historic figures, rather than all-out cartoon-fantasy.

      Anyways, it was time to paint the last two colors of Britannian heraldry: black and white. I just received a new bottle of white paint from Vallejo, so what better option to try it out than a complete side of a horse on a black primer? Also on trial today is the Super Shader from Coat d'Arms. Does it do anything differently than the GW shader?

      So, to the white paint. I'm currently using the paint unthinned. I've understood now that I really should thin them down, but for the purpose of the test let's see how they perform unthinned. The first thing you will notice is that the Vallejo paint is much more fluid already, straight out of the bottle. This immediately leads me to thinking it's also thinner, so let's see how it holds up in coverage versus GW's Ceramite White.
      So first layer, GW on the left and Vallejo on the right:

      Second layer:

      Third layer:

      Fourth layer:

      It's quite clear now that there's not much difference in coverage. GW might have the edge slightly but at the cost of thickness which increases brush strokes. You can see the difference in smoothness on this close-up:

      So, next stop shading. Here's the horse covered in Super Shader from Coat d'Arms

      And the other side covered in Nuln Oil from GW:

      It's quite clear that they have very different purposes. The CdA Super Shader is much thinner is better used for adding shadows around details such as horse reins, while the Nuln Oil is better for shading and darkening the whole area.

      After this I just drybrushed and highlighted the horse back with the Vallejo white. Having done this I started thinking whether it would be possible to skip the first base+vash step and just highlight it up just from the black primer? So let's do that with the rider. I don't have any WIP pictures, but here he is at the end of it all:

      I actually liked that approach much better. And it seems to reduce the paint build-up as well, as there is no "unnecessary" paint. I wonder if you could do the same with yellow over a brown base? Or any other color?

      On these guys I also got to try out the Micro Set and Micro Sol from Microscale and they are highly recommended for working with transfers! I got them from MiD Belgium which I also can recommended. Fast shipping and good prices. They also refunded half the shipping (€4) as the actual shipping came out cheaper than their ebay store calculated.

      Especially Micro Sol makes the transfers blend nicely into the horses barding. On these guys I also Ardcoated the guys before putting on the transfers and combined with Micro Set that made positioning quite a lot easier.

      Here they are in all their glory. This time even with bases:


      I actually really liked how the black guys turned out, so I decided to promote them to standard bearers. Not that they are carrying the banner of the regiment (Burgundy and Green) as well as the banner of the Baron (Celeste + Fleur de lis):

      One thing I do need some C&C on is whether to ardcoat the armor or not? I've done this with all the models up untill now, but looking at the Knights of the Realm they don't look to bad with a more muted look on the armor. In the pictures below, all the KotR have Army Painter Anti-Shine as the top layer, while the Knights Aspirants have been given a glazing of Ardcoat on the armor. Any thoughts on which looks better:



      Currently posting a lot of Dread Elf WIP pictures over at: MrMossevig's Painting League 2019 - The Year of the Dragon

      My previous KoE project and complete army pictures: Army of Celeste

      The post was edited 1 time, last by mrmossevig ().

    • The last two guys

      So, time to paint the last two dudes: The Champion and the Musician. The champion is the youngest of the Baron's legimate sons, and the only one that has yet to see combat. What he lacks in skills he makes up in denial. He's not very highly regarded by the Knights of the Realm that he's leading, but what can you do when he's the son of a Baron.

      Anyways, being of the Baron's family he's wearing the color of Celeste, and the Baron's crest. At some point I was actually thoroughly disappointed with this guy as the color made it look like the horse were wearing pyjamas, but with the big transfers on the barding I think it turned out pretty well. These big transfers could never be set on the horse's barding without using the Micro Sol and Micro Set. For the transfer i added some pure, watered down white in the middle to make it stand out better, and added some Nuln Oil on top of it in the shadows to make it blend more with the horse:


      I do have a problem find transfers in the 'right' size. The medium sized transfers from Ginfritters are a bit small, that's the one on the Yeomen and the big ones are used on this guy, and you can see they're huge. For the shield they barely fit. I wish there was something in between. All the other horses use transfers from Veni Vidi Vici and those are about the size of the medium Ginfritters transfer, i.e. just a little too small for the knights.

      For the musician I used all the colors, to make him serve as a final exam on whether I now can paint all the colors. I think I passed on all except yellow. F*ck yellow. Actually I think the orangy-yellow I had on the first knights turned out better than this, much brighter yellow. C&C appreciated on this

      Anyways, his heraldry almost makes him look like a joker, which I think is perfect for the musician of the group. The lance was stripped of his hand and glued to the horse (and his back). A good soldier never travels without his weapon.


      That's it for now. All my completed models are now in the army album:


      I have just received the Pegasus Knights from Fireforge, so the plan is to do them next, let's see how that turns out..
      Currently posting a lot of Dread Elf WIP pictures over at: MrMossevig's Painting League 2019 - The Year of the Dragon

      My previous KoE project and complete army pictures: Army of Celeste

      The post was edited 1 time, last by mrmossevig ().

    • edwin1982 wrote:

      how do you rate the pegasus from fireforge?
      They look interesting but...
      If Mossevig don't mind me interjecting: They're very nice, using a cloud for a flying base in a bold touch which I quite like. I wish the wings were larger and more varied but having them small makes them actually possible to rank up which Pegasi normally don't do :)

      The riders are just Templar Knighst so they're pretty nice too
      I haz a blog! the-ninth-age.com/blog/index.p…-the-moment-aslo-batreps/.

      Mostly KoE and ID stuff. Now also some Void