Kegiz Gavem – Nemed Dhuraz - the Ethiopian Dwarves of Light

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    • Ghiznuk wrote:

      ** « Dwarves created tools against cranes » –– sorry, what was that ? :)
      => see fluff p. 4, On Pygmies fighting Cranes + Pictures of Pygmies fighting Cranes. That is so prevalent a myth to pass up.

      ** Also, what is a « Great » griffon ? (why Great) ?
      => because it is the same as EoS, which is "Great". Now, I am open for diversity, if someone suggests.


      ** Mountain Sailors : i notice this unit for the first time :)
      Excellent special weapon with interesting concept ! ––> « cannot use their shield » means doesn't get « Parry », or doesn't get both « Parry » and the +1 Arm from the Shield ?? => both. Isn't it clear? I can add "... and cannot Parry either".
      Why Unbreakable ? (i understand that they're an equivalent of Seekers, but i still don't see that rule justified for the provided fluff)
      => Indeed. Removed. Made much cheaper and scoring.

      ** Gliders : they can start a move from a Cliff… which is Impassable Terrain
      => not impassable when you fly! Changing to read "top of".

      Also it's not very clear from first reading what the Pylon is about. Could be reworded => :thumbup:


      ** Balloon :
      Forge Gun is just one shot per turn, which seems pretty weak.
      Shrapnel Bombs seem a tad difficult to use with March Move 9 and Sweeping Attacks. I understand that it's logical, but still… especially given the size of its base !
      => Size a bit reduced, 1 more HP, 2 shots.
      – I'd give it some more Hit Points, 4 or 5. :thumbup: => Cost increased...
      pdf above updated (not word).


      Ghiznuk wrote:

      ** Crafting Stone : I'm wondering if we couldn't have more stuff related to the concept in the army.

      Firstly, we don't have a Stonesmith Character.
      Secondly, such a Character could be there to boost Stone Statues or still craft some magic items (not metal, but specific artefacts), enchant walls/building on the battlefield (build bridges over rivers… etc.), allow for specific Hold Stones, etc.
      Let's be creative ^^
      :P :thumbsup: Could you suggest some rules? I love the idea that this character would be a Temple Guardian upgrade.

      Social Media Team

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      - druchii.net contribution: The 9th Age - Dread Elves
    • No specific idea at the moment, I'm looking at the other people :tongue:
      To copy the rule from the UD Tomb Architect might be a good start.


      Cliff :
      Still don't understand.
      It says you must be on a Cliff to start a Flying Move.
      That means you need to be on top of that Cliff at the beginning of the Movement Phase.
      How did you get there ?
      Since it is forbidden to end your movement (even a Fly Move) on a Cliff.
      GHAÂAÂAÂARN ! — The Black Goat of the Woods with a Thousand Young
      First T9A player in West Africa
    • OK, got it.
      Problem: Cliff being impassable, you cannot be closer to 1" from it at the start of the move, so not "on top".

      Solution:
      "Slope Masters: Universal Rule.
      The unit may start a Fly move only from an elevated position, which can be a Hill, the higher side of a Cliff, a Forest, a Building… or a Pylon or a Balloon (see Pylon rule).
      The unit must end its Fly move on a lower position, i.e. not an elevated position."

      Social Media Team

      UN Coordinator, aka UNSG

      - druchii.net contribution: The 9th Age - Dread Elves
    • keep it simple.
      do you want to put baloons? fly! nothing more, maybe slow fly not marching 7" movment and marching (like chariots).

      I like the idea, I'll try to say what i don't like so much and what i wuold like to see.

      The bow... ok is new stuff..but for me is not so strong... or appeiling. what do you think about aspen bow?

      Ras Guard and Holy Watch: as this dwarves are a lot religious maybe you can mix the two units to create something completely new.

      gliders; keep it simple, let's flyyyyyyy :)

      Ras: great style, but i'll love if he could be more similar to a paladin. for me -thanes and ras (oh my gosh, what is the plural of ras???) have to have an option to become a paladin, so you can cancel the paladin charachter cause you already have. :). oh my gosh instead a griffon i wish a lion chariot...IRON LIKE A LION IN KEGIZ GAVEM!

      Pilgrims, ok, let's talk about have a holy reliquie as equitaine (or a ark of ages like khemri :P )

      the bow...i wish it was an aspen bow like khemry (for guardians too!!)
    • @Calisson what do you mean by « the higher side of a Cliff » ???
      A Cliff is just a square or round bit of terrain that is equally Impassable on all sides, I really don't see what you mean by that…
      Maybe they could just be within a few inches of that Cliff and then it works ?


      *** I LOVE the idea of getting lions in the army.
      It is after all a symbol of the Ras.
      But I don't see them as packs, as we already have plenty of such in other armies.
      So, yes, CHARIOT, definitely ^^

      *** in general i agree with Mercenary Armies that we could merge some of the existing characters.
      That would also make some more room for the Stonecarver.
      GHAÂAÂAÂARN ! — The Black Goat of the Woods with a Thousand Young
      First T9A player in West Africa

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Ghiznuk ().

    • ANYWAY guys.
      I finally decided that I could take a break from translating stuff.


      So here is this.


      ETHIOPIA AND THE HORN OF AFRICA IN THE 13-14-15-16th CENTURIES


      (A General History of Africa, UNESCO)


      Setting before the Salomonids
      Display Spoiler

      In the 13th century, the christian kingdom of Ethiopia went from the Zagwe family to the Salomonid dynasty. It went all the way from the land of the Shoa plateau to the East of lake Tana and the upper Nile, until the edge of the Plateau.
      There were other kingdoms : beyond river Takhazé were the Falasha (Ethiopian Jews), fighting agains Christendom. The pagan kingdom of Godjam in the mountains south of lake Tana. And the Pagan kingdom of Damot (with king Motelami) in the deep river valleys.
      There were Muslim kingdoms, too, along the sea and on the Dahlak islands : Awfaat, Dawaaro, Araabayni, Hadyaa, Sharkhaa, Fetegar, Daaraa, Baali, Adal. The coastal cities of Brava, Zaylaa', Berberaa, Maqdashaw, Merka were the centres of Muslim culture and with time managed to create an actual Muslim empire along the Somalian coast and hinterland. The sea was very important, strategically located in between Egypt, Ethiopia, Southern Africa and Arabia.

      At this period, most kingdoms only appear in texts if they have been militarily conquered (they are mentioned in lists of conquests).

      In the Middle Ages, most people talked the Kushitic languages (Bedja, Agaw, and many many other dialects). The Gez language was the litterary and religious language since the 4th century. Arabic was of course the commercial language in all the coastal cities, along with all the different local African languages.

      Between Ethiopia and Yemen, several archipelagos form a kind of strategic land bridge.
      From the 9th century, the biggest of these islands (Dahlak al Kabiir) became an important stronghold for the Zabiid kings of Yemen, who promoted trade and piracy and fought of claims by the Egyptian Mamluks while occasionally allying with them against the Yemen and Ethiopian kings. They retained independance until Portuguese colonization.

      The Somali city of Zaylaa' was active in trading, camel and sheep herding, and fishing. It was a big city with recurrent issues of urbanization and sanitation.

      Maqdashaw was a great trading city. Sheep herding allowed for a thriving clothing industry. Agriculture provides bananas, mangos, vegetables and rice. Ships upon arrival in the port are welcomed by the « sunbuuk » fishing boats that help unload cargo. The mood is friendly and welcoming to all visitors. The city is ruled by a merchant oligarchy and the bureaucracy, under a sultan or sheikh, with his different vizirs.

      Berberaa, Merka and Brava were known from Ancient times as important harbours, described by Greek and Egyptian explorers. Berberaa gave its name to the gulf (also named Aden gulf).

      All in all, there was a lot of interaction, mostly trade, between the different communities, Christian, Muslim and Pagan, for centuries, even though both Christian and Muslims had very strong cultural, even « national » identities.
      Trade consisted in salt, horses, donkeys.
      There were some prosperous farmers, with very big families, and owning many slaves.

      In Ethiopia, the dynasty called « Salomonid » was founded by Yekuno-Amlak, a local Amhara leader. Part of history says that he was a descendant of the Ancient dynasty of Aksum, but this is most probably propaganda to legitimize his taking over the Zagwé kingdom. There is a painting showing him sitting on a high throne, surrounded by « muslims and slaves ». With him, the political centre of Ethiopia was set much further South than before, allowing Ethiopia to take part more directly in trade.



      The Salomonids in Ethiopia
      Display Spoiler
      The first years were very difficult as the new dynasty had to fight to assert its authority.
      The two biggest issues were defining of the rules of succession and defining an efficient policy of relationships between Muslims and Christians, inside the kingdom and abroad.

      Succession was established thus : on mount Geshen, from then on known as « mountain of Kings », were detained all the male descendants of the king (except himself and his direct sons), on the highest tops, surrounded by hundreds of faithful warriors. The princes had everything they needed to live happily there. They were cut from any social or political life with the rest of the kingdom and spent their days reading, studying (mostly religious texts), writing poetry in Gez as well as religious music. If the king died without a heir, one of the princes from mount Geshen was chosen to be king.

      The greatson of Yekuno-Amlak was Amde Tsion (1314-1344) ; he is the one who established Ethiopian ruler on all the region by his conquests.
      At the time when he rose to the throne, Ethiopia was very small and surrounded by the hostility of his neighbours, Muslims, Jewish and Pagans. He started by the smaller, nearer kingdoms, gathered a great army from the conquered territories, and then was in position to take all the land up to the coastal cities.
      Those became very hostile towards Ethiopia. Amdé Tsion started complaining that they were taking measures to restrain the freedom of movement for his merchants.
      When Aq al-Diin, grandson of the king Omar Walasma of Awfaat, took a Christian and sold him as slave, this was a pretext for the invasion of Awfaat and its lands. The king died and his son Deradir took up the resistance with the help of Muslim herders, but in vain.
      This convinced the other Muslim cities to make peace and friendship with Ethiopia.
      Ethiopia had become a great empire but there were many localized uprisings, including Christian rebels in Tigray, and the king had to travel a lot to lead his army here and there. A new round of uprisings in 1332 allowed the victorious king to add even more territory to his empire.
      Al-Umari writes : « It is said that the king has 99 kings under his orders, and he is the 100th one ! »

      Vassal States of Ethiopia
      Display Spoiler
      The empire was not a unified one. Many principalties had some autonomy, their own religion, ethnicity, language and leaders. As soon as the central power showed signs of weakness, the lesser kingdoms tried to reassert independance.
      Even though most dynasties remained in place after the conquest, the local kings had to be confirmed by the emperor in Amhara for their authority to be recognized. Whenever one king died, all the males from his family went together to the emperor and he chose one of them as king.
      The Ethiopian supremacy was assured by the might of its permanent army, with garrisons a bit everywhere. The local garrison leaders answered only to the emperor or his court. As a rule of thumb, soldiers in the garrisons always came from other regions of the empire and often did not speak the local language.
      The garrisons made sure that the roads were safe and the will of the emperor done. In case of emergencies, other contingents came as reinforcements. The king often led the army in person in case of particularly serious uprisings.
      At the end of the 16th century though, problems were getting so frequent that the king and his court had to travel all the time to quell constant uprisings everywhere, and this is why we don't see any major city developing in the Ethiopian centre at this period.




      Political structure of Ethiopia

      Display Spoiler
      The Salomonid kings administered their territoires from their moving warcamps. But the court remained the centre of the empire, no matter where it was located. A great crowd of thousands of people followed it everywhere it went. The court itself was made of representatives of all the different ethnic and religious groups of the land.
      Many people came to the court to pay homage to the emperor, ask for his justice, etc.
      There were artists, craftsmen, traders…
      The fact that it was moving allowed the court to create bonds with different regions of the empire, which was a unifying and integrating factor. However, it had negative impacts as well, since the presence of this nomadic city weighted heavily on local supplies (agriculture, etc.) and often materials were seized by force by request of the emperor.
      Despite a vast network of imperial envoys in all the different regions, there never was an actual unified administration, local laws and regulations prevailed a bit everywhere, as long as they were not conflicting with the reign of the emperor.

      The empire financed itself by tributes, by the rent on lands that were given as fiefs to the most deserving vassals, and by trade (both taxes and emperor taking part in business).
      International trade was slaves, gold and ivory, sent to the Middle-East.
      The fertile lands of the plateau brought cereals and fruits to the coastal cities.
      But all this finally led to further development of the coastal cities, who were in a better and better position to assert themselves.
      The cities bonded in a vast network of Muslim opposition, until the djihaad launched by the imam Ahhmad Ibn Ibrahim around 1530, which definitely brought Ethiopia down.


      Display Spoiler
      The Ethiopian church

      Under the Salomonids, the church is renewed and the kings do efforts to convert the hinterland. In general, before that, the church was well-established only in the Ancient lands, in Central and Southern Ethiopia (Tigray, Wag, Lasta, Angot, Amhara). The only theological schools were in Tigray and Lasta, which were also the HQ of the Egyptian church (of which depended the Ethiopian church). So most church leaders came from those provinces.
      With the new dynasty, new schools get established everywhere and a serious effort is made to spread the faith. Almost all of those new schools derive from the one founded by the monk Jesus-Mo'a on the island in lake Hayq.

      The rule with those monks was that they joined the orders to « retreat from the world » and pray for their own salvation. They built their monasteries in some forgotten place, a cave, a mountain side, a desert… places very hard to reach. The founder usually lived alone or with a few disciples. The community survived as gatherers or tilled the land in common. Then the local communities who admired them started paying them tribute, talked about how saint were their local hermits, and more and more people came to visit them, knowing about their reputation.
      Those monasteries grew rich by gifts from powerful people in exchange for prayers or blessings. They had lands, cattle, etc. They built grander and grander shrines, had schools and rooms for many monks, students and people in need. There were pilgrimages and holy days for miracles and cures.
      Monasteries were at the centre of actual towns and ruled other covents far away. They were led by a council of elected monks.

      The monastic schools taught not only religion but also tradition, history, reading, writing, music (very important for the church), poetry, Gez grammar, etc.
      There were painters and calligraphists. The great monasteries competed to attract the best of those artists. There were decorated manuscripts, diptycs, frescoes, that have been maintained until today by the same church.
      Priests had the right to get married, so they lived also with their families.
      Promising students got scholarships from the monastery. There were not only future priests. Until modern times, the church had the monopoly of all education in Ethiopia. To get distinction in study meant a good job at the top of the political structure. Most high courtiers had been educated in the monastries.

      The biggest monastries were Debré Asbo (later renamed as Debré Libanos) founded by Teklé-Haymanot ; Debré Gol, founded by Anorewos and Beselote-Mikael ; Daga island, in lake Tana, founded by Hirute Amlak. All those founders were disciples of Jesus-Mo'a. Many other such schools were founded by various monks everywhere in the country. Another famous priest is Eustateos who converted whole regions by himself.

      All this action was combined with the conquests of the emperor who settled his monks to establish new schools and monasteries in all regions, including and especially the ones who followed different faiths.
      The most common pretext for the emperor's expedition was refusal by the local communities to help those monks do their job of converting.
      The close bond between church and State, that was in the beginning a unifying factor, meant that the vassal States quickly saw the emperor as imposing his religion and culture, which added to their resentment. Despite all the efforts, the church never actually managed to win the hearts and souls of the people in those provinces.

      During all that period, the Ethiopian church remained a vassal of the Egyptian church in Alexandria, whose patriarch named the bishops in Ethiopia.
      There were two competing « houses » in the church : that of Teklé-Haymanot and that of Eustateos. The first one had close bonds with the imperial court and ruled a very important monastery. The second one was a militant order who had converted whole regions in the North, especially Erythrea.

      It has to be said that the church remained very decentralized despite all that, since all the monasteries had a great level of autonomy, even if they nominally depended on someone above them. The emperor and the bishops did their utmost to centralize it of course, by using the bishop's right to name the priests. But the monasteries fought on their side to avoid the establishment of an actual national centralized structure.

      Finally, there were a lot of debates between the different orders and communities on questions of doctrine, liturgy, etc., during which the authority of the Egyptian patriarch became seriously contested. At the end of the 15thcentury, a powerful movement rose to break up with the Egyptian church, but aborted. ( ? no explanation)

      Religious diplomacy

      Display Spoiler
      Christianity meant the emperor could always rely on an alliance with other Christian countries, including their strongholds in Palestine. This is a reason why the emperor never allowed the church to fully separate from the Egyptian one. They also participated as much as they could in the Crusades.

      But it was a major problem in the relations with the powerful Muslim neighbours, who controlled all the sea trade. Egypt also controlled all the land and routes North, to the Mediterranean.
      The diplomacy towards Egypt was very cautious. Every time a new bishop came, Ethiopia sent slaves, gold and other gifts to the Mamluk sultan. They also wrote to the sultan to ask for safety for the pilgrims going and returning from Jerusalem.

      Yekuno-Amlak himself wrote to the Egyptian sultan Baybars, calling himself the « humblest of his servants ».

      But with Amdé Tsion, Ethiopia became more assertive. Since the sultan claimed to protect Muslims in Ethiopia, the emperor demanded from the sultan that he also protected the Christians in Egypt – which he did, by intervening against persecutions of Christians in his land by local Muslims.

      With Saïfa-Arad (1344-1370), this conflict became more serious. That emperor led an army into Egypt to help the king of Cyprus who had invaded Alexandria.

      His son Dawit (1380-1412) took Assuan.

      Emperor Yeshak (1413-1430) is a staunch enemy of islam, and tries to forge an alliance with Europe to uproot islam from the Middle East. But his delegates, upon returning from Europe, were hanged, along with many European crusader uniforms they were bringing back to Ethiopia.

      More and more Ethiopian pilgrims were traveling to Jerusalem despite the difficulties. There was a whole chain of Ethiopian communities in the monasteries in Egypt all the way to the Holy Land, as well as in Armenia, in Greece and Cyprus, and in Italy. Those people were talking a lot about the conquests of their emperor, and this is when the legend of « Priester John » came to be (initially the legend was about some dude supposedly living in India, but he was relocated to Ethiopia in the myth).

      At the same time, people were openly discussing in Europe of the possibility to get Ethiopia join the Crusades, especially since it was known that it was getting more and more agressive against Egypt (and vice-versa). Some travellers write at this time that the Ethiopian kings are keen to get more regular news from their European brothers, but the Egyptian sultan blocks all communications, especially Europeans are prevented from crossing his lands.

      Emperor Zera-Yakob (1434-1468), brother of Yeshak, was a learned man who contributed a lot to the litterature of his time, especially theological treatises. He worked a lot towards reconciliation with the order of Eustateos, at odds with the rest of church for more than a hundred years. In general, he restructured the church and declared illegal all Pagan customs and beliefs in his empire. He solved by himself many religious disputes among the church and repressed dissident monks.

      He founded a permanent capital in Debré-Berhan. He dug a new harbour in Girar on the Red sea.
      He also quelled uprisings and attacks by his neighbours of Adal and his Muslim vassal of Hadyaa.

      Zera-Yakob also protested to the sultan Jaqmaq upon the destruction of the famous Christian church of Mitmaq in Egypt. Having received a sarcastic reply, he imprisoned for four years the man who carried that letter to him. This emperor sent a new delegation in 1450 to Europe, who, this time, managed to visit Roma and Napoli and came back with a whole group of European craftsmen.

      Nevertheless, Egypt was truly a power to be counted with. They controlled all paths to the Mediterranean and could pressure the Patriarch at any time. Every time the patriarch was too seriously threatened, Ethiopia had to calm down. As a reprisal to Zera-Yakob imprisoning the above-mentioned emissary, the sultan had the Patriarch beaten and forced him to demand the release of the sultan's man. In 1448, the sultan had also forced the Patriarch to agree that he could not get in touch with Ethiopia without his consent. As a consequence, when the Egyptian bishop of Ethiopia died, noone came to replace him during more than thirty years, until the reign of Zera-Yakob's grandson, Eskender (who had to send many gifts to the sultan for that). « Priests became numerous, churches were restored and the joy spread throughout the land ».




      Decline
      Display Spoiler
      The great activity by emperor Zera-Yakob to restructure and reform the kingdom were met by much resistance, including attempts to unseat him. He answered by a staunch repression against all dissent, by exiling or imprisoning top dignitaries and church leaders as needed.

      One of the first things his son Baida Mariam (1468-1478) did upon accessing the throne was to free all those political prisoners, and release some of that centralization. But this only encouraged revolts on several fronts, and never did that king manage to equal his father in his efforts to maintain authority. At his death, he only left two underage sons. The empire was thrown into a succession war.

      The decline kept going on until the final djihaad that brought Ethiopia down for decades.




      Names :

      Mountains :
      Display Spoiler
      Shoa Plateau
      Harrar Plateau
      mount Geshen
      Rivers :
      Display Spoiler
      Takhazé river
      lake Tana
      lake Chamo
      Omo river
      Awash river
      Masawah channel
      Wash river
      Abbai river
      lake Hayq
      Kingdoms and regions :
      Display Spoiler
      Zagwé
      Salomonids
      Falacha
      Godjam
      Damot
      Awfaat
      Dawaaro
      Hadyaa
      Fetegar
      Baali
      Adal
      Daaraa
      Arabaynii
      Sharkhaa
      Tigray
      Bilin
      Bogos
      Amhara
      Arussi
      Welega
      Aksum empire
      Farsan island
      Dahlak islands
      Angot
      Wello
      Lasta
      Wag
      Marya
      Hamasen
      Serae
      Kunama

      Cities :
      Display Spoiler
      Brava
      Zaylaa'
      Berberaa
      Maqdashaw
      Merka
      Wag
      Lasta
      Harrar
      Zaylaa
      Yaakuut
      Ifat
      Debré Damo
      Debré Asbo
      Debré Libanos
      Debré Gol
      Debré Bizen
      Daga
      Debré Berhan

      Peoples :
      Display Spoiler
      Ibn Battuuta, explorer (yes, him again)
      Ibn Khalduun, explorer (him again, too)
      Yekuno-Amlak, Ethiopian king
      Motelami, Pagan king
      Al-Omari, historian
      Baybars, sultan of Egypt
      Amdé Tsion, Ethiopian king
      Omar Walasma, Muslim king of Awfaat
      Deradir, son of the former
      Aq al-Diin, son of this former
      Ahhmad Ibn Ibrahim, imam who launched the anti-Ethiopian djihaad
      Jesus-Mo'a, monk
      Tekle-Haymanot, monk
      Anorewos, monk
      Beselote-Mikael, monk
      Hirute Amlak, monk
      Eustateos, monk
      Saïfa-Arad, Ethiopian king
      al-Maqriizii, historian
      Dawit 1st, Ethiopian king
      Yeshak, Ethiopian king
      Taghriibirdii, arab writer
      Eskender, Ethiopian king
      Baida Mariam, Ethiopian king


      Stuff :
      Display Spoiler
      Sunbuuk boat
      « Abunna » = bishop
      « Aqabeseat » = representative of the monasteries at the court
      « Debré » = monastery or holy place
      GHAÂAÂAÂARN ! — The Black Goat of the Woods with a Thousand Young
      First T9A player in West Africa
    • Ghiznuk wrote:

      @Calisson what do you mean by « the higher side of a Cliff » ???
      A Cliff is just a square or round bit of terrain that is equally Impassable on all sides, I really don't see what you mean by that…
      Maybe it is my ignorance of what players use for cliffs on gaming tables.
      For me, a cliff is a vertical surface separating a high plateau from a low plateau.
      What you describe, I would call that a mesa.


      -=-=-

      Mercenary Armies wrote:

      keep it simple. baloons? fly! nothing more, maybe slow fly not marching 7" movment and marching (like chariots). :thumbup:

      The bow... ok is new stuff..but for me is not so strong... or appeiling. what do you think about aspen bow?

      => Composite Horn Bow exists in RL, and is smaller than long bow, so better adapted to stunties...

      Aspen Bow is for by down-river, skelly Humans.

      I wish a lion chariot...IRON LIKE A LION IN KEGIZ GAVEM!

      + Pilgrims, ok, let's talk about have a holy reliquie as equitaine (or a ark of ages like khemri
      => what about a reliquary chariot pulled by lions?

      Social Media Team

      UN Coordinator, aka UNSG

      - druchii.net contribution: The 9th Age - Dread Elves
    • That reliquary chariot would be cool AS WELL.

      But I'm still relishing the idea of a Ras mounted on a Lion Chariot since it came into my head ^^


      –––––––––––

      ON CLIFFS :
      BRB, p.74

      Cliffs
      Types Cliffs are Opaque Terrain and Impassable Terrain.
      Cover Cliffs contribute to Hard Cover.


      So, on the table, a Cliff is just a big, grey, block that blocks lines of sight, contributes to cover, and on which no model can end (nor start) its movement.
      As such, they are in general not very well designed ^^ Since any cardboard box or tin can can do the trick.
      GHAÂAÂAÂARN ! — The Black Goat of the Woods with a Thousand Young
      First T9A player in West Africa
    • Griffon :
      I just noticed that there is a difference between a Griffon and a Great Griffon !
      8o

      The Great Griffon is on a 50×100 base, has Str 6, AP 3 and a ground movement rate of 7/14. It is used by Sonnstahl.
      The Griffon (not great) is on a 50×50 base, has Str 5, AP 3 and a ground movement rate of 6/12 (but both versions have the same Fly movement rate, lolzz) ; it also has Devastating Charge (+1 Att/Str/AP) and Lightning Reflexes. It is used by the Highborn Elves.


      Now, only word comes to my mind : WHY


      @Calisson shouldn't we push for some harmonizing between the different books here ??
      GHAÂAÂAÂARN ! — The Black Goat of the Woods with a Thousand Young
      First T9A player in West Africa
    • @Calisson
      Don't know if you've read all the encyclopedic stuff I posted on Ethiopian history in the Middle Ages.
      From what I see, there are five interesting lines of fluff :
      1) the constant enmity between the Christian core and the vassal Muslim trading cities – could get some inspiration, for example in our fluff those cities could be Humans or (hob)Goblins, at odds with the bigoted Dwarves that overrule them. They could also be Infernal colonies.
      2) the monasteries : very, very, very important. Most of them lie as the foundation of whole cities, and are major centres of education and art. The church plays a major role in the country's politics. There is bitter rivalry between the monasteries (to attract the best artists, scholars, etc.) despite the outward unity of the Church.
      3) rival branches of the church, with the more fiery missionaries orders criticizing the more established monastic ones.
      4) the nomadic court – interesting concept, but actually I'm not sure it fits to our Dwarves
      5) the constant attempt at forging alliances with the Christian lands of Europe, in order to weaken Egypt and ensure free trade and exchanges between Europe and Ethiopia, as well as protecting the pilgrims to the Holy Land (Avras ???? but we already including a pilgrimage to the Rift)

      BY THE WAY, this is just Ethiopian history until the end of the 15 century, but the 16th holds many interesting bits as well, with the Muslim djihaad and the arrival of the Portuguese !

      Was wondering also if you'd be interested by me summarizing and reposting it ?
      Also I'm wondering if researching Sudanese history would bring us any interesting stuff for our Taphrian Orc army ?
      GHAÂAÂAÂARN ! — The Black Goat of the Woods with a Thousand Young
      First T9A player in West Africa
    • Who's the portuguese in this analogy? High elves? Dread elves? Sonnstahlers? Destrians?
      A summary of all proposed ideas from the VS LAB brainstorm thread

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    • @Ghiznuk creatures have been intentionally separated between AB's to allow each faction to be designed for its own needs. :)

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    • Ghiznuk wrote:

      Don't know if you've read all the encyclopedic stuff I posted => of course I did!

      1) the constant enmity between the Christian core and the vassal Muslim trading cities – could get some inspiration, for example in our fluff those cities could be Humans or (hob)Goblins, at odds with the bigoted Dwarves that overrule them. They could also be Infernal colonies.
      => Noting that one of the 3 local goblin variants (yet to be released, still on my to-dolist) is highly religious to the point of fanatism, we will get the permanent religion war - except that there is no possibility of interbreeding, like Romeo & Juliet...
      I do not like the idea of vassals, though. It does not "feel" right for a DH Auxiliary Book to get some other races as vassals.


      2) the monasteries
      3) rival branches of the church
      => good inspiration, yes. It "only" require some writing...

      4) the nomadic court – interesting concept, but actually I'm not sure it fits to our Dwarves
      => don't know either. Will see while working on fluff.
      We don't HAVE to mimic every asepct of old Ethiopia, do we? :)


      5) the constant attempt at forging alliances with the Christian lands of Europe, in order to weaken Egypt and ensure free trade and exchanges between Europe and Ethiopia, as well as protecting the pilgrims to the Holy Land (Avras ???? but we already including a pilgrimage to the Rift)
      => that's precisely why I introduced Priest John Prester Jonaz, and also, read again Koghi's background (III), you'll see an allusion (except I named him Johan, not Jonaz, so I have to modify that).

      -=-=-
      Also I'm wondering if researching Sudanese history would bring us any interesting stuff for our Taphrian Orc army ?

      Sure it will (I did my homework on that already), but do not limit to Sudanese, use also Somali history as well:
      - Mad religious leader (inspired by Mad Mullah, Mahdi)
      - Cannibals (found about a cannibal Pharaoh!)
      - Pirates (still ongoing...)

      Sorry for not being hyperactive on T9A, but on the other hand, I visited today in Paris the Sainte Chapelle and the Museum Quai Branly, plenty of visual inspiration for Traphria! :P

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    • We don't have to mimic every aspect of old Ethiopia no.

      On vassalage… well, history shows that those Somali cities never really accepted their tutelage, it was just that the Ethiopians maintained a tight military watch but uprisings were constant.

      So that could be that at some point in the past, the Gavemites controlled some of those (hob)goblin harbours, but not today anymore.


      Never heard of the Sainte Chapelle…
      By the way, how do you manage to visit two museums in one and the same day ? That sounds like a very rushed visit :D
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    • <off topic reply>

      Ghiznuk wrote:

      Never heard of the Sainte Chapelle…

      By the way, how do you manage to visit two museums in one and the same day ? That sounds like a very rushed visit :D
      A jewel of medieval architecture, built in 1248 by King Saint Louis to shelter holy relics. Restored in 1855 to medieval state.
      Painted glass are extraordinary. See Pilgrims and Saracen Homebrew. Now I have a lot more pics of knights. :P

      Took me 2 hours to visit at length.
      The other museum took me 6 hours. Got now plenty of pics of masks. Vodun Homebrew may get more pics. :P Not forgetting other Taphrian Homebrews. But not much for Kegiz Gavem.

      Today, only one museum... Louvre.

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