Stone, Water, and War: My adventures in terrain and miniatures

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    • Little Joe wrote:

      I am a big fan of Arcworlde, what warband are you working on?
      Oh, that's awesome! I only just found about the game a couple months ago when looking at terrain blogs for Frostgrave.

      I kind of went nuts, lol. Went on a shopping binge at Warploque and spent way more than I could afford! Absolutely fell in love with the Halflings and Albionica. Ended up with about 60 minis. total including a Forest Troll and also the mercenary Explorer and mercenary Wizard. Also got both rulebooks and a couple decks of the cards.

      I have everything cleaned up and based, now it's on to a massive priming job and the painting begins!

      Do you have the game rules and any minis. for it?
      There are many magic rings in the world Bilbo Baggins, and none of them should be used lightly!

      The post was edited 5 times, last by Baranovich ().

    • Here some images of my Bayourks.

      I have all the old armies, been a collector since the early days. The times Alex Huntley was a kid and tried to sell through various crowdfunding platforms before his first kickstarter was a success. Now I feel old. :oldmen: I still need to paint up a lot, it's all in a big white box. Too much Facebook for me to follow it all these days, I check up the old way which is easy enough.
      There is some terrain as well, a bridge and a tumulus. Both of which will end up on my happy happy board.

      Reminds me that I have some Bayourk bosses ready for paint, there is a promise to myself to go shopping once those are done ...
    • Hello again my fellow painting and modeling maniacs!

      With all the discussion going about GW's new contrast paints, I did some new experiments just this afternoon that show how some flesh tones and undead look with Contrasts applied over white undercoats:

      Link:
      Citadel Contrast Paints

      But in addition to that I also returned back to a GW product I had put aside for quite some time, and I think it's one that the gaming community has largely overlooked and forgotten. But they should NOT!

      In 2018 GW released AOS 2.0 with their boxed starter set Soul Wars. At that time they also released two new technical paints specifically made for their new Nighthaunt range.

      The best way I can describe Nighthaunt Gloom is that it's a super, super concentrated wash. Along with the Hexwraith Flame, both have heavy, heavy pigments and coverage. The Hexwraith Flame I found could be used at full strength over a white undercoat. However, the Nighthaunt Gloom is so strong that it can be extensively thinned with medium to achieve some truly superior and amazing shading and highlighting on the undead be be they skeletons or zombies.

      For the game Frostgrave I bought the undead boxed set which comes with a small company of plastic zombies. They come in really nice, dynamic poses and the sculpts themselves are excellent.

      Here's the results of using a thinned Nighthaunt Gloom over Corax White undercoat spray. It does just about a perfect job of staying in recesses and crevices while also leaving enough of the white undercoat shining through. The end result is an absolutely GORGEOUS, pale, deathly, decayed flesh color!

      I thinned the Nighthaunt Gloom with both P3 mixing medium and Citadel Lahman medium:

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      There are many magic rings in the world Bilbo Baggins, and none of them should be used lightly!

      The post was edited 2 times, last by Baranovich ().

    • What's up with Wargames Foundry Paints?

      I wanted to make this post because over the past year or more I've noticed something very curious on Youtube and also on the 9th Age forums. In all the numerous discussion about the many different brands of paints, brushes, techniques and the ways that gamers make them work to their advantage I literally almost never see any mention of Wargames Foundry Paints!

      It's most surprising on the pro-painter Youtube channels. I watched quite a few videos about paints they recommend and what they think is the best for pro paint jobs. I see Games Workshop, Vallejo, Reaper, and Scale 75 talked about CONSTANTLY. Scale 75 in particular seems to be a paint line that the pro painters gravitate towards because of its advanced formula, pigment, and coverage etc. Vallejo much the same thing.

      But strangely absent from nearly all of these paint videos is Wargames Foundry! I truly don't understand why these paints are not more widely known about or recommended! It's almost as if they are like an invisible paint line that occasionally pokes it head out from under a rock which I find to be totally bizarre!

      If you have not ever used Foundry paints or have not heard of them, I highly recommend that you check them out.

      First and foremost I'm amazed that so many pro painters are not aware that Foundry paints are purposely thinned to the consistency where you can use them right out of the pot. I mean that quite literally. Foundry paints are thinned to that "milky" consistency that you always hear GW preaching about or pro painters preaching about with regards to "two thin coats" vs. one thick one. Well Foundry comes that way when you buy it! The pigment is SUPER strong. You can thin Foundry paints further if you desire but there's no need to. That's why I find it just bizarre that this paint line is hardly ever mentioned by pro-painters, neither on Youtube or on painting blogs.

      I wonder if pro painters assume that because Foundry uses a Triage system that they think of Foundry as being like "short-cut" or "beginner paints".

      If so they are sorely mistaken and making very poor assumptions!

      If you have not seen what a Triage paint system can do then you are denying yourself an amazing tool to have in your hobby arsenal!

      I own the entire basic palette Foundry paint range, about 40 colors. They work as I said as a straight-out-of-the-bottle system in which you have preset color values that come in groups of three:

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      Each color is represented by three paints: A, which is the shade, B which is the mid-tone, and C which is the highlight. The cool thing about these triages is that the value of the colors is already pre-matched! You don't have to guess what the next shade of purple should be to highlight a cloak or tunic, you don't have to guess how much white to add to a base color to get the right highlight tone. If you use the triage together you are GUARANTEED to get matching values every time you paint your shade, mid, and highlight!

      Another huge, huge, huge advantage to the Foundry system is that it allows you to paint models and indeed entire armies with ZERO washes. That is correct. ZERO washes. The entire system has a philosophy that you can use nothing but layer paints on top of one another to achieve all the gradients of a color. It works as a "bottom-up" paint system where you always paint your shade first, the middle color on top of that, and the lightest color on top of that. The triage system can be brushed on or drybrushed for softer gradients. But it's all the same principle, it's all layer paints with no need to do washes.

      I absolutely love this paint system! For painting armies I truly do not see how a pro painter could reject this system. Yes, for the most purist pro I guess this system is "cheating" because you're not mixing your own tones and you're not wet-blending, you're not adding white to any color to create custom tones. But for the love of Sonnstahl why if you're painting whole armies why
      would you NOT want an advantage in having pre-mixed color tones????? If a purple already has its three shades established and all you have to do is put them on the model, is that "cheating"?

      The new GW Contrast Paints reminded me of this paint range because like the Contrast paints, this paint range is just another potential tool you can have in your hobby arsenal. Doesn't mean you have to paint all your models with this range. But when there's a color you need and you just don't want to go through the hassle of mixing your own tones or you don't want to hassle with using washes, you simply cannot ignore the Foundry paint system!

      ...final thought. If you think miniatures that are painted using no washes and only pre-matched color tones can't look like pro-paint jobs...well...check these out. Remember when you look at these - these have NO washes, NO wet blending, and NO custom mixing of paints.

      Happy painting my friends! :thumbup:




      There are many magic rings in the world Bilbo Baggins, and none of them should be used lightly!

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Baranovich ().

    • IIRC, foundry paints, the old GW paints from the 90's, and Coat D'arms are all done by the same company. (I think P3 uses them too, but don't hold me to that)

      Head of Lectors

      Advisory Board

      Quick Starter Team

      "...take a step back and remember that we are playing a game where we roll dice and move little people around the board."

      - Grouchy Badger

    • kisanis wrote:

      IIRC, foundry paints, the old GW paints from the 90's, and Coat D'arms are all done by the same company. (I think P3 uses them too, but don't hold me to that)
      Exactly right! Indeed both Foundry and Coat D'Arms come in the same tall flip-top pots. I believe you're right about P3 as well. These are all the same excellent pot design that GW used to use way, way back before the dark times when they switched to the awful pots they use now.

      Why GW ever abandoned that old pot design is beyond me. Some claim it's because they wanted their paints to be in pots that visually set their brand apart from the competitors' pots.

      Whatever GW's reason was I can tell you this. I've got Foundry paints that are 15+ years old and the paint in them is as fresh and liquid as day one.

      Indeed if you look on eBay for vintage GW boxed paint sets from the 80s and 90s you can often get them still sealed. And inside you will find those GW colors in their unopened, classic Foundry/Coat D'Arms pots....and sure as the sun comes up even pots that are 20-25 years old have paint inside absolutely as fresh as the day the pots were filled!
      There are many magic rings in the world Bilbo Baggins, and none of them should be used lightly!
    • Wolves worthy of a 9th Age winter

      I'm currently working on a huge amount of miniatures for the skirmish games Frostgrave and Arcworlde. My previous blog post discussed the large-scale terrain project that I completed for winter tabletops. With the the terrain complete I turned to the giant pile of unpainted minis. I had collected for the games.

      I decided to start with some of the wandering monsters and creatures first.

      The models here are Reaper Bones soft plastic. I was skeptical of the Reaper Bones range at first. But I quickly discovered that the detail is pretty amazing and the soft plastic actually takes paint way better than I imagined it would. Plus as you probably know the prices of Reaper Bones minis. are amazingly cheap! And once they're painted it's pretty difficult to tell that whether they are soft plastic or the more traditional hard styrene plastic.

      I had initially intended to paint my pack of giant wolves with a simple under coat of white with GW's Contrast paint over it. The Contrast paint did a good job of shading and highlighting the fur, but I wasn't satisfied with their final look. I wanted to them to look colder, like the fur insulated their bodies well but yet still reflected the frigid environment they had to survive in. I thought of what kinds of colors could capture that deep cold feel.

      I looked through my collection of paints and washes and finally saw the perfect shade: Secret Weapon Miniatures Cool Grey Wash. Secret Weapon washes work in a very similar way to GW's new contrast paints. They have a very high concentration of pigment and most of them can be thinned quite a bit and still provide very strong shading.

      The Cool Grey ended up being just about the perfect color for my wolves! I washed it right over the existing brown contrast paint. When it had dried I had wolves what had light brown fur yet a hint of blue in it that made them look almost as if they had ice and frost clinging to their fur. They looked great at this point, but I wanted to give them a final highlight to bring out the fur details a little more. I went with Vallejo Dead White which finished the job perfectly.

      The end result was a fur that looked like it was brown underneath, with some graying happening at the tips of the fur, and finally the frigid blue tone subtly blending with the brown. The white highlight completed the final look.

      Recently I've become very much obsessed with wargaming winter environments! It's by far my favorite type of gaming table to play battles on. Even though I built all the terrain and am painting all of this new stuff for my skirmish games which are set in the winter, I still intend to use all the terrain and some of the creatures like the wolves as background scenery for 9th Age games. Obviously you will always see terrain on gaming tables, but it's not often seen where you add wildlife to that terrain.

      So here's the final version of my giant winter wolves. I can't wait to finish the bases and add snow effects and perhaps some human bones scattered around their feet!

      Happy winter painting my friends. :thumbup:

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      There are many magic rings in the world Bilbo Baggins, and none of them should be used lightly!

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Baranovich ().

    • ...I just noticed that annoying remnant of a mold line on the back leg of that one wolf! So weird how they manage to hide when I'm actually looking at the mini and painting it. Sometimes I don't see them until after I'm done shading and highlighting which of course makes them visible again! X(

      That's also one aspect of Reaper Bones that can be challenging. Because the minis. are soft plastic, mold lines can tend to "bend under" and resist being scraped away. And since the plastic is white mold lines can be camouflaged until you go to actually paint the mini. The solution I have found is that you have to press harder when scraping the lines and really dig in to get them off. But that's not an issue because the soft plastic makes them flexible so you can press really hard without and danger of the models snapping like hard plastic might.

      Not a big deal though, will just clean it up and put the same color scheme over the leg again.
      There are many magic rings in the world Bilbo Baggins, and none of them should be used lightly!
    • Little Joe wrote:

      It's the magnification of the images.

      The wolves look great.
      Thanks!

      Yeah it's weird the way a camera's lighting can exaggerate something. When I look at that model when holding it up close that mold line is nearly invisible and actually not worth scraping and having to repaint. It's the camera that focuses and magnifies and it looks much worse in closeup photographs!
      There are many magic rings in the world Bilbo Baggins, and none of them should be used lightly!
    • Baranovich wrote:

      Little Joe wrote:

      It's the magnification of the images.

      The wolves look great.
      Thanks!
      Yeah it's weird the way a camera's lighting can exaggerate something. When I look at that model when holding it up close that mold line is nearly invisible and actually not worth scraping and having to repaint. It's the camera that focuses and magnifies and it looks much worse in closeup photographs!
      In my experience taking photos is a great way to see if you have missed something or if something looks off with the paint job. I almost always find something wrong with my minis the minute I post a picture here. :thumbsup:
      Stuff like mould lines usually shows up a bit more punishing than they are IRL.
    • Here are two additional photos of the modular river terrain I recently completed.

      You can see how the pieces look when all linked together.

      I purposely took these photos in the day time and at a low angle so you can see the amazing job that Mod Podge does of looking like water with light reflecting off it. The high gloss here really does a convincing job of looking like a real river in the daylight.

      Doing ten or so sections is generally enough to stretch across a good part of a 4 x 6 table, either straight across the short length or a winding curve going from the long edge to the short edge:

      ">
      ">

      There are many magic rings in the world Bilbo Baggins, and none of them should be used lightly!
    • Citadel Contrast Paints on Reaper Bones giants and trolls

      Hello all!

      So as of late I've gotten into a real zone with getting lots of hobby things done. I reorganized a lot of things and now have a number of major projects line up one behind the other and with a clear plan for each one. The past month and a half I've completed a flurry of both painting and terrain projects.

      Right now I'm working through my massive Frostgrave and Arcworlde collection. Many of my creatures and monsters for the games are giants and trolls. I used the momentum and experience I got from using the Citadel Contrasts on human flesh and thought I would continue to use it on larger models that needed flesh tones done.

      To my pleasant surprise I've discovered that the Contrasts work incredibly well on Reaper Bones soft plastic models! I was very, very skeptical at first of Reaper Bones because they are so cheap in price and because of the whole soft plastic deal. Man I was wrong about these models. They paint up beautifully.

      It seems that the flesh Contrasts work even better over the smoothness of the Reaper Bones plastic than regular styrene plastic or resin. I think one of the reasons for this is that it's recommended that you don't prime Reaper Bones but start painting straight away with base coats. So you start off with a smoother, brushed on painted surface as opposed to a sprayed on undercoat. I think that with sprayed undercoats the Contrasts soak in a bit into the sprayed surface and it can increase the tendency to stain or darken the undercoat if used too heavily.

      With Reaper Bones it's not a problem because the Contrast can't soak in to a smooth surface painted with acrylic paint. The result is absolutely perfect shading in the recesses.

      I could not have hoped for better results on these! The cool thing about the giant is that 80% of the model is literally two base coat colors, Wargames Foundry Flesh over the skin and Vallejo Dead White over the fur clothing areas. I then used the Guilliman Flesh over the skin and I used Skeleton Horde over his fur clothing. Everything else was then painted using normal layer paints and washes/highlight drybrushing.

      Even the finest details in the face got shaded and detailed perfectly by the Contrast paint.

      I also used the Guilliman Flesh and Skeleton Horde on a resin forest troll made by Warploque Miniatures. Same result, excellent shading of the flesh and fur areas.

      I do want to note here that I DID supplement the flesh on these with an additional highlight of Foundry Flesh C Light to brighten it up slightly. But it wasn't necessary to do it, it looked amazing with just the contrast. But I wanted to bring out details like the veins on his arms and the face, finger, and toe details a bit more:

      ">">">">">">">

      Here's one final photo of the series of models I worked on. Included in this shot are also two more Reaper Bones soft plastic trolls. I did those in a pale gray base coat and put Secret Weapon Pale Gray wash over it to create a kind of winter-themed troll skin. I also used the Secret Weapon Pale Gray on their hair to give a feel of them living in a cold, frigid environment:

      ">
      There are many magic rings in the world Bilbo Baggins, and none of them should be used lightly!

      The post was edited 2 times, last by Baranovich ().

    • Little Joe wrote:

      Don't tell GW or they will go Bonesium as well. :D

      So the contrast paints have enough surface tension to shade the bare plastic, that is interesting.
      Lol, very true!

      Oh actually no, it wasn't over the bare plastic. I think the way I described it was poorly written. Sorry, didn't mean to confuse anyone. I did a base coat of Foundry flesh over the skin and Vallejo Game Color White over the fur areas before applying the Contrasts, it was just that I did brushed on base coats as opposed to spraying the model.

      Honestly I'm not sure if the Contrasts would work over totally bare plastic, I think they always need some kind of paint under them first to work.

      Sorry for the confusion!
      There are many magic rings in the world Bilbo Baggins, and none of them should be used lightly!

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Baranovich ().

    • kisanis wrote:

      they dont work on the bare plastic.

      I saw a video testing it.

      Im curious about the pre-primed dnd minis tho!
      Here is Ash from Guerrilla Miniature Games doing the pre-primed Nolzur's DnD mini's.

      What Can Citadel Contrast DO? - Paint Nolzur's Marvelous Minis OOTB?

      I would image the pre-painted minis may have the same issue that the Reaper Bones Line has, but I have nothing to beyond having both types to base that assumption on.

      @Baranovich it's looking great, keep up the great work. Also, Reaper Bones is in the process of being redone, as far as I can tell, and they are moving away from the soft white and my entire Bones 4 kickstarter and few other mini I've purchased recently are moving to a harder gray. I haven't had the chance to paint one up yet, but it does seem that it will be easier to paint out of the box (though I will still prime).
      Armies: OK :OK: , EoS :EoS: , BH :BH: and SA :SA:

      The post was edited 1 time, last by shadoweyed: Adding more info. ().